The Kingdom of Childhood: Seven Lectures and Answers to Questions Given in Torquay, August 12-20, 1924

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Anthroposophic Press, 1995 - Education - 155 pages
2 Reviews
These seven intimate, aphoristic talks were presented to a small group on Steiner's final visit to England. Because they were given to "pioneers" dedicated to opening a new Waldorf school, these talks are often considered one of the best introductions to Waldorf education. Steiner shows the necessity for teachers to work on themselves first, in order to transform their own inherent gifts. He explains the need to use humor to keep their teaching lively and imaginative. Above all, he stresses the tremendous importance of doing everything in the knowledge that children are citizens of both the spiritual and the earthly worlds. And, throughout these lectures, he continually returns to the practical value of Waldorf education. These talks are filled with practical illustrations and revolve around certain themes-the need for observation in teachers; the dangers of stressing the intellect too early; children's need for teaching that is concrete and pictorial; the education of children's souls through wonder and reverence; the importance of first presenting the "whole," then the parts, to the children's imagination. Here is one of the best introductions to Waldorf education, straight from the man who started it all.

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Review: The Kingdom of Childhood

User Review  - Roger Buck - Goodreads

The children! The children! How Rudolf Steiner loved the child. So much so that he said we should building dozens of new Waldorf schools every years. By now there should be thousands and thousands of ... Read full review

Review: The Kingdom of Childhood

User Review  - Hope - Goodreads

Very good! I found myself underlining and saying "Yes!" to a good part of this book. The passion of Steiner is certainly palpable in his lectures and he has a way of engendering deep excitement in his ... Read full review

About the author (1995)

Austrian-born Rudolf Steiner was a noted Goethe (see Vol. 2) scholar and private student of the occult who became involved with Theosophy in Germany in 1902, when he met Annie Besant (1847--1933), a devoted follower of Madame Helena P. Blavatsky (1831--1891). In 1912 he broke with the Theosophists because of what he regarded as their oriental bias and established a system of his own, which he called Anthroposophy (anthro meaning "man"; sophia sophia meaning "wisdom"), a "spiritual science" he hoped would restore humanism to a materialistic world. In 1923 he set up headquarters for the Society of Anthroposophy in New York City. Steiner believed that human beings had evolved to the point where material existence had obscured spiritual capacities and that Christ had come to reverse that trend and to inaugurate an age of spiritual reintegration. He advocated that education, art, agriculture, and science be based on spiritual principles and infused with the psychic powers he believed were latent in everyone. The world center of the Anhthroposophical Society today is in Dornach, Switzerland, in a building designed by Steiner. The nonproselytizing society is noted for its schools.

Helen Fox is on the faculty of the Sweetland Writing Center at the University of Michigan where she heads the Graduate Student Writing Project. She is the author of When Race Breaks Out: Conversations about Race and Racism in University Classrooms (2001) and Listening to the World: Cultural Issues in Academic Writing (1994).

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