Nobody's Fool

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster, Jun 7, 2002 - Biography & Autobiography - 352 pages
7 Reviews
Gottfried's capably researched and recounted biography offers a none too flattering glimpse into Kaye's well-guarded personal life, including his egotism, cruelty, his strained marriage and his flirtations and affairs. His career is treated in detail, from his obvious early talent to the creation of his acting personae and his sad professional and personal decline before his death in 1987. Lacks a bibliography. Annotation copyright by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR
  

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Review: Nobody's Fool: The Lives of Danny Kaye

User Review  - Grace - Goodreads

This is a very thorough, analytical look at the life of Danny Kaye, supposedly one of the greatest performers of all time, who I never heard of until a month ago. The writing is excellent and there's ... Read full review

Review: Nobody's Fool: The Lives of Danny Kaye

User Review  - Carmelina - Goodreads

This biography has the distinction my having not read one since. Sometimes it may be better not knowing about stars you love watching on film etc. I felt that Gottfried didn't like his subject matter and this went double for Kaye's wife. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
7
Section 2
13
Section 3
24
Section 4
35
Section 5
43
Section 6
52
Section 7
63
Section 8
72
Section 17
185
Section 18
199
Section 19
201
Section 20
215
Section 21
231
Section 22
243
Section 23
253
Section 24
262

Section 9
80
Section 10
89
Section 11
100
Section 12
107
Section 13
119
Section 14
126
Section 15
163
Section 16
176
Section 25
273
Section 26
282
Section 27
293
Section 28
301
Section 29
313
Section 30
320
Section 31
333
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Martin Gottfried was born in Brooklyn, New York on October 9, 1933. He graduated from Columbia College in 1955, attended Columbia Law School, and served in the Army in Europe. He worked as a classical music critic for The Village Voice and an Off Broadway critic for Women's Wear Daily before becoming a drama critic for The New York Post in the mid-1970s and then for the Saturday Review near the end of the decade. His first book of criticism, A Theater Divided: The Postwar American Stage, was published in 1968 and won the George Jean Nathan Award for dramatic criticism. His other works include Broadway Musicals and More Broadway Musicals. He also wrote several biographies of entertainers and playwrights. His first biography, Jed Harris: The Curse of Genius, was published in 1984. His other biographies include All His Jazz: The Life and Death of Bob Fosse, George Burns and the Hundred Year Dash, and Arthur Miller: His Life and Work. He died from complications of pneumonia on March 6, 2014 at the age of 80.

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