Unlocking the Files of the FBI: A Guide to Its Records and Classification System

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Rowman & Littlefield, 1993 - History - 348 pages
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This comprehensive guide explains what kinds of documents the FBI holds, where they are located, and how to gain access to them. The FBI has investigated a vast range of activities: communism, civil rights and antiwar protests, organised crime, political corruption, terrorists, and even foreign espionage. The massive amount of documentation produced on countless cases is divided into hundreds of major classifications. Now under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), more of these valuable records are open to researchers than ever before. Haines and Langbart provide a focused description of the contents of every one of the more than 278 classifications the bureau uses to organise its efforts. They also include descriptions of special, unclassified records, and a full explanation of the FOIA, with a sample letter requesting access under the act; FBI organisational charts; a sample showing how the bureau sanitises documents; and other information.
  

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Contents

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Copyright

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References to this book

The FBI: A History
Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones
No preview available - 2007
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About the author (1993)

Gerald K. Haines is a senior historian on the DCI History staff of the Central Intelligence Agency and was a member of the NARA/FBI Task Force that evaluated preservation options for FBI records. David A. Langbart is an archivist on the staff of the Records Appraisal and Disposition Division of the National Archives.

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