The Crimson Fairy Book

Front Cover
Andrew Lang
Courier Dover Publications, 1903 - Juvenile Fiction - 371 pages
10 Reviews
It is almost impossible to envision what childhood would be like without the enchanting world of fairyland. Princes and princesses, kings and queens, giants and dwarfs, monsters and magicians, fairies and ogres - these are the companions who thrill young boys and girls of all lands and all times, as Andrew Lang's phenomenally successful collections of stories have proved. From the day that they were first printed, the Lang fairy books of many colors have entertained thousands of boys and girls, as they have also brought pleasure to the many parents who have read these unforgettable classics to their children.
  

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Review: The Crimson Fairy Book (Coloured Fairy Books #8)

User Review  - Nan Silvernail - Goodreads

More and more tales. Read full review

Review: The Crimson Fairy Book (Coloured Fairy Books #8)

User Review  - Michiyo 'jia' Fujiwara - Goodreads

Mew, mew, mew! Prince, look quick behind you! In the well is fair Lizina, And you've got nothing but Peppina. The Colony Of Cats Lembayung.. 1903 03/30/13 Read full review

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Contents

Zonlra
9
The Hary Man
22
The Story of the Seven Simona 87
37
The Language of Beasts
55
The Prince and the Dragon
80
Little Wildrose
99
Paperarello
122
The Strong Pririce
145
The Rogue and the Herdsman
253
The Death of Abu Nouzaa and of his Wife
273
Motikatika
280
Shepherd Paul
295
How the wicked Tanuki was puriisliezl
306
The Horse Gullfazi and the Sword Gunnfiider
314
The Story of the Sham Prince or the Ambitious Tailor
326
The Colony of Cats
340

The Cottager and his Cat
174
The Stonecutter
192
Tritill Litill amd the Birds
213
Hungry Beasts
233
How to find out a True Friend
350
Clever Maria
359
The Magic Kettle
368
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About the author (1903)

Andrew Lang was born at Selkirk in Scotland on March 31, 1844. He was a historian, poet, novelist, journalist, translator, and anthropologist, in connection with his work on literary texts. He was educated at Edinburgh Academy, St. Andrews University, and Balliol College, Oxford University, becoming a fellow at Merton College. His poetry includes Ballads and Lyrics of Old France (1872), Ballades in Blue China (1880--81), and Grass of Parnassus (1888--92). His anthropology and his defense of the value of folklore as the basis of religion is expressed in his works Custom and Myth (1884), Myth, Ritual and Religion (1887), and The Making of Religion (1898). He also translated Homer and critiqued James G. Frazer's views of mythology as expressed in The Golden Bough. He was considered a good historian, with a readable narrative style and knowledge of the original sources including his works A History of Scotland (1900-7), James VI and the Gowrie Mystery (1902), and Sir George Mackenzie (1909). He was one of the most important collectors of folk and fairy tales. His collections of Fairy books, including The Blue Fairy Book, preserved and handed down many of the better-known folk tales from the time. He died of angina pectoris on July 20, 1912.

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