B-29 Hunters of the JAAF

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Osprey Publishing, 2001 - History - 128 pages
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'B-29!' No other term struck such terror in the hearts of the Japanese public during World War 2 than this single, most-hated name. It was then only natural that the pilots who attempted to shoot these high-flying Boeing bombers out of the skies over Tokyo, Nagasaki, Hiroshima and Kobe should become known as the elite of the Japanese Army Air Force. This book details the exploits of the ‘Dragon Slayers’ who, flying the very latest single- and twin-engined fighters, exacted a heavy toll on the AAF Boeing bombers using a range of tactics including ramming.
  

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Contents

JAAF VERSUS THE 58th BW
6
JAAF VERSUS THE 73rd BW
24
PHASE TWO OPERATIONS
82
FINAL PHASE AGAINST THE B29
102
COLOUR PLATES COMMENTARY
120
INDEX
128
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

KOJI TAKAKI can remember seeing B-29s and other military aircraft in the skies over Saeki City in Oita Prefecture, East Kyushu, during his primary school years. Taught to speak English when still a student, he has been an avid collector of literature on wartime Japanese military aviation since the late 1950s. Now retired after a long career in the textiles industry, Takaki is working on several book projects with Henry Sakaida. This is his first volume for Osprey.
A third generation Japanese American (Sansei), Henry Sakaida has spent much of his life researching the shadowy history of the Japanese fighter pilot. His eye for detail and exhaustive research has led to him being given access to much archive material by former aces who have remained silent since the end of the war.

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