The Cold War: A New History

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Penguin, Dec 26, 2006 - Political Science - 352 pages
127 Reviews
The “dean of Cold War historians” (The New York Times) now presents the definitive account of the global confrontation that dominated the last half of the twentieth century. Drawing on newly opened archives and the reminiscences of the major players, John Lewis Gaddis explains not just what happened but why—from the months in 1945 when the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. went from alliance to antagonism to the barely averted holocaust of the Cuban Missile Crisis to the maneuvers of Nixon and Mao, Reagan and Gorbachev. Brilliant, accessible, almost Shakespearean in its drama, The Cold War stands as a triumphant summation of the era that, more than any other, shaped our own.


  

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Well researched, good information, and easy to read. - Goodreads
Not much new information, but an excellent overview. - Goodreads
Good intro/overview of the Cold War. Easy reading. - Goodreads
Great overall coverage of the topic. - Goodreads
Excellent book and easy to read. - Goodreads
A good starting point to know about Cold War. - Goodreads

Review: The Cold War: A New History

User Review  - Özgür Şahin - Goodreads

A good summary of the Cold War which includes the fundementals of this part of the history. In particular, the explanation of the evolution of the strategies leading the nuclear balance and the logic ... Read full review

Review: The Cold War: A New History

User Review  - Terry Quirke - Goodreads

A good overall background primer, Gaddis approaches the period through a thematic approach rather than chronological and looks at the overall sweep of things rather than digging down into specific ... Read full review

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THE VIEW FORWARD
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DEATHBOATS AND LIFEBOATS
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COMMAND VERSUS SPONTANEITY
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THE EMERGENCE OF AUTONOMY
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THE RECOVERY OF EQUITY
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ACTORS
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THE TRIUMPH OF HOPE
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THE VIEW BACK
1990
DOCUMENTS
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INTERVIEWS
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ARTICLES
1999
UNPUBLISHED MATERIAL
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Copyright

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About the author (2006)

John Lewis Gaddis is the Robert A. Lovett Professor of History of Yale University. He is the author of numerous books, including The United States and the Origins of the Cold War, 1941-1947 (1972); Strategies of Containment: A Critical Appraisal of Postwar American National Security (1982); The Long Peace: Inquiries into the History of the Cold War (1987); We Now Know: Rethinking Cold War History (1997); The Landscape of History: How Historians Map the Past (2002); and Surprise, Security, and the American Experience (2004).

Bibliographic information