The electric telegraph: its history and progress (Google eBook)

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1852
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Page 41 - In electricity he has made a remarkable discovery : you write two or three words on a paper ; he takes it with him into a room, and turns a machine inclosed in a cylindrical case, at the top of which is an electrometer, a small fine pith ball; a wire connects with a similar cylinder and electrometer in a distant apartment ; and his wife, by remarking the corresponding motions of the ball, writes down the words they indicate : from which it appears that he has formed an alphabet of motions. As the...
Page 150 - ... into execution. The central situation of Belgium with regard to other countries renders the formation of these lines of essential importance in continental communications. Already the ramifications of electro-telegraphs extend from one end of Europe to the other : the lines to connect Petersburg with Moscow, and with the Russian ports on the Black Sea and the Baltic, are in progress ; other wires stretch from the capital of the czar to Vienna and Berlin, taking Cracow, Warsaw, and Posen on the...
Page 174 - Europe, and with heavy orders for agricultural produce, the farmers in the interior of the state of New York, informed of the state of things by the magnetic telegraph, were thronging the streets of Albany with innumerable team-loads of grain almost as quickly after the arrival of the steamer at Boston as the news of that arrival could ordinarily have reached them.
Page 173 - Day, 1850, a catastrophe, which it is fearful to contemplate, was averted by the aid of the telegraph. A collision had occurred to an empty train at Gravesend ; and the driver having leaped from his engine, the latter started alone at full speed to London. Notice was immediately given by telegraph to London and other stations ; and while the line was kept clear, an engine and other arrangements were prepared as a buttress to receive the runaway.
Page 57 - When he required to permanently record the intelligence, these needles were furnished with small tubes holding ink, and by their motions dots were made on paper properly moved in front of them by wound-up mechanism ; one needle making dots in one line, and the other needle making dots in a line underneath the former.
Page 177 - Speak the word, and think the thought, Quick 'tis as with lightning caught, Over under lands or seas, To the far antipodes. Now o'er cities thronged with men, Forest now or lonely glen ; Now where busy Commerce broods, Now in wildest solitudes; Now where Christian temples stand, Now afar in Pagan land. Here again as soon as gone, Making all the earth as one. Moscow speaks at twelve o'clock, London reads ore noon the shock; Seems it not a feat sublime, Intellect hath conquered Time!
Page 54 - The details of this contrivance are so obvious, and the principle on which it is founded so well understood, that there was only one question which could render the result doubtful ; and this was, is there any diminution of effect by lengthening the conducting wire...
Page 5 - Ingenious as this idea was, the practical objections it offered prevented its adoption, and Government also appears to have discouraged the inventor. " Lord Melville," he observes, " was obliging enough in reply to my application to him to request Mr. Hay ' to see me on the subject of my discovery,' but before the nature of it had been yet known, except to the late Lord Henniker, Dr. Rees, Mr. Brande and a few friends, I received an intimation from Mr. Barrow to the effect, ' that Telegraphs of any...
Page 173 - A collision had occurred to an empty train at Gravesend ; and the driver having leaped from his engine, the latter started alone at full speed to London. Notice was immediately given by telegraph to London and other stations ; and while the line was kept clear, an engine and other arrangements were prepared as a buttress to receive the runaway. The superintendent of the railway also started down the line on an engine ; and on passing the runaway he reversed his engine, and had it transferred at the...
Page 174 - ... could not make any defence. The sessions were then going on at the Old Bailey. Though no one who attends that court can doubt that impartial justice and leniency are administered to the prisoners, yet there is no one who does not marvel at the truly railway-speed with which the trials are conducted. By a little after ten the next morning such was the speed not only was a true bill found, but the trial by petty-jury was concluded, and the thief sentenced to expiate his offence by ten years'...

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