Evolutionism in Cultural Anthropology: A Critical History

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Westview Press, 2003 - Science - 322 pages
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Evolutionism in Cultural Anthropologytraces the interaction of evolutionary thought and anthropological theory from Herbert Spencer to the twenty-first century. It is a focused examination of how the idea of evolution has continued to provide anthropology with a master principle around which a vast body of data can be organized and synthesized. Erudite and readable, and quoting extensively from early theorists (such as Edward Tylor, Lewis Henry Morgan, John McLennan, Henry Maine, and James Frazer) so that the reader might judge them on the basis of their own words, Evolutionism in Cultural Anthropology is useful reading for courses in anthropological theory and the history of anthropology.
  

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Contents

The Early History of Evolutionism
1
The Reconstruction of Cultural Evolution
9
The Characteristics of Cultural Evolution
27
The Determinants of Cultural Evolution
39
AntiEvolutionism in the Ascendancy
75
Early Stages in the Reemergence of Evolutionism
99
Issues m Late Midcentury Evolutionism
127
Features of the Evolutionary Process
151
What Drives the Evolution of Culture?
185
Other Perspectives on Cultural Evolution
213
Elements of Evolutionary Formulations
229
Current Issues and Attitudes in
263
References Cited v
289
Index
313
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About the author (2003)

Robert L. Carneiro Curator of South American Ethnology, American Museum of Natural History, and adjunct professor of Anthropology at Columbia University. His field work has been among the Kuikuru of central Brazil, the Amahuaca of eastern Peru, and the Yanomamo of southern Venezuela.

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