Letters on the Events which Have Passed in France Since the Restoration in 1815 (Google eBook)

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Baldwin, Cradock & Joy, 1819 - France - 199 pages
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Page 2 - B powerfully called forth by the attraction of some great object, we are not easily cured of long cherished predilection. Those who believed as firmly as myself in the first promises of the revolution, have perhaps sometimes felt, like me, a pang of disappointment ; but no doubt continue, like me, to love liberty, " quand meme, " to use the famous unfinished phrase of an Ultra, applied to the King — it may have given some cause of complaint.
Page 81 - And you, brave COBHAM ! to the latest breath, Shall feel your ruling passion strong in death : Such in those moments as in all the past ; " Oh, save my country, Heaven !
Page 67 - ... to spare the chamber one single page, although the discussion is perhaps nearly closed ; and they are not of the class of speakers who find new arguments when the old are exhausted. The assembly sometimes, unable to endure any more, call to their honourable colleague to pass over a few leaves of the manuscript ; but the next morning that very member is called un orateur, in all the journals ; and his constituents are not apprized, that the assembly considered him as taking a cruel advantage in...
Page 1 - DISAVOW your ill-founded conjectures respecting my prolonged silence : the interest I once took in the French Revolution is not chilled, and the enthusiasm I once felt for the cause of liberty still warms my bosom.
Page 9 - They know that liberty is the prize for which many of their parents (relatives) bled in the field, or perished on the scaffold. •But they are too well read in modern history, of which their country has been the great theatre, to seek for liberty where it is not to be found. They do not resemble that misled and insensate . multitude, who, in the first years of the Revolution, had just thrown off their chains, and profaned, in their ignorance, the cause they revered. The present race are better taught,...
Page 1 - The interest I once took in the French Revolution is not chilled, and the enthusiasm I once felt for the cause of Liberty still warms my bosom. Were it otherwise I might perhaps make a tolerable defence, at least for a woman, by reverting to the past, and recapitulating a small part only of all I have seen, and all I have suffered.
Page 73 - Perhaps in the mysterious chain that links successive events, the time when foreign armies filled this country may not be lost for mankind. The crusades that so long devastated Europe roused the human mind from its long lethargy, and unfolded its intellectual powers. Who shall say that the armies of the north have not imbibed new ideas of freedom and independence while they sojourned in France...
Page 65 - ... inserted ; they must go to the tribune in the succession in which their names are marked. Not one word are they permitted to articulate in their place ; if they think proper to speak, they must leave their seat, march to the tribune, ascend the steps, and when they have reached their pulpit, the glow of feeling has, perhaps, been chilled on the way; the sentiment is evaporated ; the ideas are dispersed ; the energies of mind have sunk under the ceremonial; and he who eagerly claimed a right to...
Page 64 - FRENCH DEBATES. The French Chamber of Deputies possesses many excellent speakers; yet what passes cannot properly be called a discussion. The members, when they intend to speak, are obliged to inscribe their names on a list, for or against the question in discussion; the order in which they are to speak, cannot be inserted ; they must go to the tribune in the succession in which their names are marked.
Page 66 - They appear at the tribune with a manuscript of tremendous size in their hand ; their head bent upon the paper; their spectacles placed on their nose; and with a pre-determination not to spare the chamber one single page, although the discussion is perhaps nearly closed ; and they are not of the class of speakers who find new arguments when the old are exhausted.

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