Terror and Reconciliation: Sri Lankan Anglophone Literature, 1983-2009

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Lexington Books, Mar 29, 2012 - Literary Criticism - 194 pages
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Terror and Reconciliation explores the English language literature that has emerged from Sri Lanka’s quarter-century long ethnic conflict. It examines poetry, short fiction and novels by both diasporic writers and writers resident in Sri Lanka. Its discussion of resident Sri Lankan writers is particularly important because it calls attention to a rich and ambitious body of work that has largely been ignored in the Western academy and media until now. The book outlines the ways in which a wide range of resident and diasporic writers have sought to represent the conflict, mourn the violence and terror associated with the conflict, and present options for reconciliation in the conflict’s aftermath. The writers discussed grapple with issues of terrorism, human rights, nationalism, war, democracy, gender, ethnicity, and reconciliation, making this a study of profound interest for students and scholars of South Asian literature and culture, postcolonial studies, race and ethnic studies, women’s studies, and peace studies.
  

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Contents

1 Sri Lankan Anglophone Literature and the Problem of Publication
1
Part One Island Dialogues
29
Part Two Diasporic Interventions
97
Conclusion
161
Bibliography
163
Index
177
About the Author
183
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About the author (2012)

Maryse Jayasuriya is assistant professor of English at the University of Texas at El Paso. She has published essays on South Asian literature in the South Asian Review, Journeys: The International Journal of Travel and Travel Writing, and the edited collection South Asia and Its Others: Reading the “Exotic.” She is an executive board member of the South Asian Literary Association and the editor of the South Asian Literary Association Newsletter. Her Ph.D. in postcolonial literature and theory is from Purdue University, and she is also a proud alumna of Mount Holyoke College.

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