Soviet Jewry and Soviet Policy

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East European Monographs, 1990 - History - 249 pages
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From the preeminent writer of Taiwanese nativist fiction and the leading translator of Chinese literature come these poignant accounts of everyday life in rural and small-town Taiwan. Huang is frequently cited as one of the most original and gifted storytellers in the Chinese language, and these selections reveal his genius.

In "The Two Sign Painters," TV reporters ambush two young workers from the country taking a break atop a twenty-four-story building. "His Son's Big Doll" introduces the tortured soul inside a walking advertisement, and in "Xiaoqi's Cap" a dissatisfied pressure-cooker salesman is fascinated by a young schoolgirl.

Huang's characters -- generally the uneducated and disadvantaged who must cope with assaults on their traditionalism, hostility from their urban brethren and, of course, the debilitating effects of poverty -- come to life in all their human uniqueness, free from idealization.

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Contents

Introduction
1
Marxism Leninism and the Russian Jews
13
Stalinism and the Rise of Nationalism
43
Copyright

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About the author (1990)

Betty S. Travitsky, archivist at the College of Staten Island, CUNY, is editor of The Paradise of Women. Anne Lake Prescott is professor of English at Barnard College and the author of Imagining Rabelais in the English Renaissance.

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