Calcutta Magazine and Monthly Register, Volumes 10-12 (Google eBook)

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S. Smith & Company, 1830
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Page 257 - They entered, the door was closed and bolted, and the mason was conducted through an echoing corridor, and a spacious hall, to an interior part of the building. Here the bandage was removed from his eyes, and he found himself in a patio,' or court, dimly lighted by a single lamp.
Page 257 - ... Emperor's commands were precise and peremptory ; and if ever there was an absolute monarch who allowed his mandate to be trifled with, certainly it was not the Emperor Paul. All that the unfortunate man could obtain from the officer, who was his friend, was just sufficient delay to enable him to throw a small quantity of clothes and linen into a trunk ; and having done this, he was led forth. A carriage, guarded by a sufficiently strong body of cavalry, •was in waiting, and, more dead than...
Page clxxii - Nothing, sir :" was the answer. " Nothing, young man!" said the Keeper, emphatically; "then I tell you that you ought to see something — you ought t'o see distinctly the true image of what you are trying to draw. I see the vision of all I paint — and I wish to heaven I could paint up to what I see.
Page 256 - tis hardly fair, is it, Frogere ?" " Quite the reverse, sire," replied the actor; " for the reputation your Majesty will leave behind you will hardly tempt any one to rob Paul in return." Now, though this was almost as good a thing as any one need wish to say, it somehow happened that his Majesty did not appear to be in the least tickled by it ; and as his Majesty did not condescend to honour it with his imperial laugh, no one else could presume to notice it by such a symptom of approbation. In fact,...
Page 261 - ... nor tell where the substance ended and shadow began, until the casual dashing of a bucket overboard for a few moments broke up the phantom ship; but the wavering fragments soon re-united, and she again floated double, like the swan of the poet.
Page 257 - Emperor that he might throw himself at his feet ? His supplications were in vain : the Emperor's commands were precise and peremptory ; and if ever there was an absolute monarch who allowed his mandate to be trifled with, certainly it was not the Emperor Paul. All that the unfortunate man could obtain from the officer, who was his friend, was just sufficient delay to enable him to throw a small quantity of clothes and linen into a trunk ; and having done this, he was led forth. A carriage, guarded...
Page 834 - Any officer or soldier who shall upbraid another for refusing a challenge, shall himself be punished as a challenger; and all officers and soldiers are hereby discharged from any disgrace or opinion of disadvantage which might arise from their having refused to accept of challenges, as they will only have acted in obedience to the laws, and done their duty as good soldiers who subject themselves to discipline.
Page 257 - Now — disgraced ; a banished and forlorn man ; a wretched shed for his resting-place; his fare so little tempting he would not yesterday have offered it to a starving mendicant , surrounded by faces " which, for the sympathy he would have implored, struck hopelessness down into the very bottom of his heart as he did but look upon them ; a traveller on a dreary, dreary journey, which, when ended, no tongue should sa'y him
Page 261 - ... twinkle like objects seen through a thin smoke, whilst each of the tall stems of the cocoa-nut trees on the beach, when looked at steadfastly, seemed to be turning round with a small spiral motion, like so many endless screws. There was a dreamy indistinctness about the outlines of the hills, even in the immediate vicinity, which increased as they receded, until the blue mountains in the horizon melted into sky. The crew were listlessly spinning oakum, and mending sails, under the shade of the...
Page ccix - I would never convict any person of murder or manslaughter unless the fact were proved to be done, or at least the body found dead.

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