From White Australia to Woomera: The Story of Australian Immigration

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Cambridge University Press, 2002 - Social Science - 243 pages
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James Jupp, migration specialist, surveys changes in Australian immigration policy over the last thirty years since the significant shift away from the White Australia Policy. Jupp considers the history of Australian immigration in the twentieth century; the establishment of the "institutions" of multiculturalism and ethnicity and the waves of attacks on multiculturalism. He looks critically at the impact of economic rationalism on migration choices, environmental debates and immigration, and the impact of "One Nation." Most importantly he covers the controversial issue of refugees and asylum seekers comprehensively.
  

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Contents

Creating an immigrant society 17881972
5
White Australia
6
Populate or perish
10
Planning and control
13
From assimilation to a multicultural society 19722002
21
The ethnic situation in 1972
23
Language and culture
24
Ethnic community organisation
27
A developing critique
113
Popular critiques
115
Summarising the conservative critique
116
Less conservative critics
119
The survival of multiculturalism
120
The impact of One Nation
123
The racist inheritance
124
The arrival of One Nation
127

The new proletariat
29
Ghettoes and ethnic suburbs
30
A political base
32
Social mobility
34
Asian settlement
35
A new middle class
36
An ethnic underclass?
37
The Fraser Hawke and Keating governments 19751996
41
The Fraser government 19751983
42
The Hawke government 19831991
46
The Keating government 19911996
49
The ministerial record
52
Prime ministerial intervention
53
Continuity and difference
56
Policy instruments and institutions
61
State government agencies
67
The advisory structures
69
Inquiries and reports
72
Consultation and representation
73
Research and advocacy
75
The ethnic communities
79
Multicultural policy
83
Australian multiculturalism
84
The foundations
85
The Galbally report
86
Multicultural institutions
89
The agenda of 1989
91
The reassessment of 1995
92
Settlement policy
93
Language policy and multicultural education
94
Access and equity
97
The agenda of 1999
98
Indigenous peoples and multiculturalism
99
Theorising multiculturalism
101
Shifting emphases
102
The attack on multiculturalism
105
Conservative criticism of multiculturalism
106
Other criticism
109
The bipartisan consensus ends 1988
110
Australians Speak
112
Hansons policies
129
One Nations immigration program of 1998
131
One Nation support
134
Graeme Campbell and One Nation
136
The influence of One Nation
137
Tragedy or farce?
138
Economic rationalism
141
The overall economic impact
144
The human capital approach
146
Selection criteria
147
User pays and costfree immigration
151
Settlement outcomes
153
The uneconomic immigrant
155
The limits of rationality
157
Sustainability and population policy
162
Populate or perish
163
Growing doubts
164
Zero population growth
167
A population policy
170
Growth limitation and devolution
173
Ageing and decline
175
Future stabilisation
176
Refugees and asylum seekers
180
The UN Convention and Protocol
182
Refugee intakes since 1975
184
The humanitarian programs
186
Boat people asylum seekers and mandatory detention
187
The shift to temporary protection
190
Tampa and the Pacific solution
193
A tough solution for a small problem
196
A past present and future success?
200
Immigration policy in a globalised economy
201
Multicultural reality
208
A glance at the future
213
Changing attitudes and values
217
19722002
220
Ministers of immigration departmental secretaries and gross annual settler intake 19732002
224
References
225
Index
233
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About the author (2002)

Dr James Jupp is the Director of the Centre for Immigration and Multicultural Studies at the Australian National University. He is a fellow of the Australian Academy of Social Sciences and its former executive officer.

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