Mechanics of Materials

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Prentice Hall, 1997 - Technology & Engineering - 855 pages
11 Reviews
This text provides a clear, comprehensive presentation of both the theory and applications of mechanics of materials. The text examines the physical behaviour of materials under load, then proceeds to model this behaviour to development theory. The contents of each chapter are organized into well-defined units that allow instructors great flexibility in course emphasis. writing style, cohesive organization, and exercises, examples, and free body diagrams to help prepare tomorrow's engineers. The book contains over 1,700 homework problems depicting realistic situations students are likely to encounter as engineers. These illustrated problems are designed to stimulate student interest and enable them to reduce problems from a physical description to a model or symbolic representation to which the theoretical principles may be applied. The problems balance FPS and SI units and are arranged in an increasing order of difficulty so students can evaluate their understanding of the material.

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I'm an engineering student currently using this book. It does a nice job of providing the relevent material on a subject in easy to understand rhetoric. It also is clear that the sequence of the material was done with thought.

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Contents

2
55
Strain
69
Mechanical Properties of Materials
85
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Russ Hibbeler "graduated from the University of Illinois-Urbana with a B.S. in Civil Engineering (major in structures) and an M.S. in Nuclear Engineering. He obtained his Ph.D. in Theoretical and Applied Mechanics from Northwestern University. Hibbeler's professional experience includes postdoctoral work in reactor safety and analysis at Argonne National Laboratory, and structural work at Chicago Bridge and Iron, Sargent and Lundy, Tucson. He has practiced engineering in Ohio, New York, and Louisiana. He has taught at the University of Illinois-Urbana, Youngstown State University, Illinois Institute of Technology, and Union College. Hibbeler currently teaches at the University of Louisiana-Lafayette.

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