The new Pantheon, or, An introduction to the mythology of the ancients (Google eBook)

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s.n., 1827
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Page 125 - That, changed through all, and yet in all the same, Great in the earth as in the ethereal frame, Warms in the sun, refreshes in the breeze, Glows...
Page 219 - First Moloch, horrid king besmeared with blood Of human sacrifice, and parents' tears, Though for the noise of drums and timbrels loud Their children's cries unheard, that passed through fire To his grim idol.
Page 219 - Astarte, queen of Heaven, with crescent horns ; To whose bright image nightly by the moon Sidonian virgins paid their vows and songs...
Page 204 - And saddled straight his coal-black steed : Down the yawning steep he rode, That leads to Hela's drear abode.
Page 177 - The primeval religion of Iran, if we rely on the authorities adduced by Mohsani Fani, was that which Newton calls the oldest (and it may be justly called the noblest) of all religions: " A firm belief that One Supreme God made the world by his power, and continually governed it by his providence; a pious fear, love, and adoration of him; a due reverence for parents and aged persons ; a fraternal affection for the whole human species, and a compassionate tenderness even for the brute creation.
Page 125 - Lives through all life, extends through all extent, Spreads undivided, operates unspent; Breathes in our soul, informs our mortal part, As full, as perfect, in a hair as heart: As full, as perfect, in vile man that mourns, As the rapt seraph that adores and burns: To him no high, no low, no great, no small; He fills, he bounds, connects, and equals all.
Page 22 - He spoke, and awful bends his sable brows, Shakes his ambrosial curls, and gives the nod, The stamp of fate, and sanction of the god : High Heaven with trembling the dread signal took, And all Olympus to the centre shook.
Page i - Hort's Pantheon. The New Pantheon; or, an Introduction to the Mythology of the Ancients, in Question and Answer : compiled for the Use of Young Persons. To which are added, an Accentuated Index, Questions for Exercise, and Poetical Illustrations of Grecian Mythology, from Homer and Virgil.
Page 75 - Above, the Sire of Gods his thunder rolls, And peals on peals redoubled rend the poles. Beneath, stern Neptune shakes the solid ground ; The forests wave, the mountains nod around ; Through all their summits tremble Ida's woods.
Page 71 - And mounts incumbent on the wings of winds, That high, through fields of air, his flight sustain, O'er the wide earth, and o'er the boundless main...

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