The Philosophy of History

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Cosimo, Inc., Jun 1, 2007 - History - 472 pages
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Review: The Philosophy of History

User Review  - Johnny Mosley - Goodreads

I read the lengthy introduction entire. Interesting ideas on world-spirit and historical purpose. Bogged down during his Eurocentric diatribe on Asian history. Symptom of the times, s'pose. Not sure ... Read full review

Review: The Philosophy of History

User Review  - Eryc Tri Juni S - Goodreads

The history repeat itself. In the beginning, according to Nietzsche, the historian must be blame because write the same historical event over and over. But now, I do believe that Hegel definitely was right, and now we just need to wait the emerging of the end of history. Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
103
III
111
IV
116
V
139
VI
173
VII
176
VIII
182
XVI
278
XVII
283
XVIII
306
XIX
314
XX
318
XXI
336
XXII
341
XXIII
347

IX
187
X
223
XI
225
XII
241
XIII
244
XIV
250
XV
275
XXIV
355
XXV
360
XXVI
366
XXVII
412
XXVIII
427
XXIX
438
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About the author (2007)

Born the son of a government clerk in Stuttgart, Germany, George Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel received his education at Tubingen in theology. Arguably the most influential philosopher of the nineteenth century, Hegel's lectures---most notably at the University of Berlin from 1818 to his death---deeply influenced not only philosophers and historians but generations of political activists of both the Right and Left, champions of the all-powerful nation-state on the one hand and Karl Marx on the other. His lectures at Berlin were the platform from which he set forth the system elaborated in his writings. At the heart of Hegel's philosophy is his philosophy of history. In his view, history works in a series of dialectical steps---thesis, antithesis, synthesis. His whole system is founded on the great triad---the Idea as thesis, Nature as antithesis, and the Spirit as synthesis. The Idea is God's will; Nature is the material world, including man; Spirit is man's self-consciousness of the Idea, his coming to an understanding of God's will. The formation over time of this consciousness is History. Spirit does not exist in the abstract for Hegel, but is comprehended in "peoples," cultures, or civilizations, in practice states. Hegelian Freedom is only possible in organized states, where a National Spirit can be realized. This National Spirit, a part of the World Spirit, is realized in History largely through the actions of World Historical Individuals, heroes such as Napoleon, who embody that Spirit. A profound misunderstanding of this doctrine led many German intellectuals to subvert it into a narrow, authoritarian nationalism that glorified the "state" as an end in itself. Although Hegel saw his philosophy as universal, applicable throughout the world, the focus and inspiration of his thought was European. And in his own even smaller world, he was content to support and work for the Prussian state, which he believed to be the highest development of history up to that time.

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