The Schoolmaster in Literature: Containing Selections from the Writings of Ascham, Molière, Fuller, Rousseau, Shenstone, Cowper, Goethe, Pestalozzi, Page, Mitford, Bronté, Hughes, Dickens, Thackeray, Irving, George Eliot, Eggleston, Thompson, and Others; with an Introduction by Edward Eggleston (Google eBook)

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Hubert Marshall Skinner
American book Company, 1892 - Literature - 608 pages
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Page 495 - They are given to all kinds of marvellous beliefs ; are subject to trances and visions, and frequently see strange sights, and hear music and voices in the air. The whole neighborhood abounds with local tales, haunted spots, and twilight superstitions ; stars shoot and meteors glare oftener across the valley than in any other part of the country, and the night-mare, with her whole nine fold, seems to make it the favorite scene of her gambols.
Page 494 - IN the bosom of one of those spacious coves which indent the eastern shore of the Hudson, at that broad expansion of the river denominated by the ancient Dutch navigators the Tappan Zee, and where they always prudently shortened sail, and implored the protection of St.
Page 495 - A drowsy, dreamy influence seems to hang over the land and to pervade the very atmosphere. Some say that the place was bewitched by a High German doctor during the early days of the settlement ; others, that an old Indian chief, the prophet or wizard of his tribe, held his pow-wows there before the country was discovered by Master Hendrick Hudson.
Page 65 - Twas her own country bred the flock so fair; 'Twas her own labor did the fleece prepare: And sooth to say, her pupils, ranged around, Through pious awe did term it passing rare; For they in gaping wonderment abound, And think, no doubt, she been the greatest wight on ground! Albeit ne flattery did corrupt her truth, Ne pompous title did debauch her ear; Goody, good-woman, gossip, n'aunt, forsooth, Or dame...
Page 65 - As is the hare-bell that adorns the field : And in her hand, for sceptre, she does wield Tway birchen sprays...
Page 387 - But a word from Florence, who was always at his side, restored him to himself; and, leaning his poor head upon her breast, he told Floy of his dream, and smiled.
Page 69 - She sees no kind domestic visage near, And soon a flood of tears begins to flow ; And gives a loose at last to unavailing woe. But ah ! what pen his piteous plight may trace ? Or what device his loud laments explain?
Page 122 - Would you your son should be a sot or dunce, Lascivious, headstrong, or all these at once ; That in good time the stripling's finish'd taste For loose expense and fashionable waste Should prove your ruin, and his own at last ; Train him in public with a mob of boys, Childish in mischief only and in noise, Else of a mannish growth, and five in ten In infidelity and lewdness men.
Page 431 - To be sure," said Squeers, by no means disconcerted. "So he is. Bot, bot, tin, tin, bottin, ney, ney, bottinney, noun substantive, a knowledge of plants. When he has learned that bottinney means a knowledge of plants, he goes and knows 'em. That's our system, Nickleby: what do you think of it?" "It's a very useful one, at any rate," answered Nicholas significantly.
Page 68 - All playful as she sate she grows demure, She finds full soon her wonted spirits flee; She meditates a prayer to set him free ; Nor gentle pardon could this dame deny, (If gentle pardon could with dames agree,) To her sad grief that swells in either eye, And wrings her so that all for pity she could die.

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