The life of Franz Schubert, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Longmans, Green, and co., 1869 - Biography & Autobiography
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Page 328 - For these were the partbooks of the whole of the music in Rosamunde, tied up after the second performance in December 1823, and probably never disturbed since.
Page 227 - Schubert's easy and brilliant mastery over the resources of an orchestra would be unintelligible, if one did not know that six other symphonies had preceded his last effort, and that he wrote it in the full maturity of his powers. Those gifts must be pronounced extraordinary in a man who, having during his lifetime heard so little of his own instrumental works, succeeded in so masterly a handling of the general body of instruments which converse with one another like human voices and chorus. Except...
Page 228 - ... of his music will be made clear to us in time. We derive this impression of certainty from the showy romantic character of the introduction, although all is still wrapped in the deepest mystery. The transition from this to the Allegro is entirely new; the tempo does not seem to vary; we are landed, we know not how. The analysis of the movements piece by piece is neither a grateful task to ourselves nor others; one would necessarily have to transcribe the entire symphony to give the faintest notion...
Page 228 - At the outset, the brilliancy, the novelty, of the instrumentation, the width and breadth of form, the exquisite interchange of vivid emotion, the entire new world in which we are landed — all this is as bewildering as any unusual thing we look upon for the first time in our lives; but there ever remains that delicious feeling which we get from some lovely legend or fairy story; we feel, above all, that the composer was master of his subject, and that the mysteries of his music will be made clear...
Page 226 - But only grant that we believe that this outer world, to-day fair, to-morrow dark, may appeal deeply to the inmost heart of the poet and musician, and that more than merely lovely melody, something above and beyond sorrow and joy, as these emotions have been portrayed a hundred times in music, lies concealed in this symphony — nay, more, that we are by the music transported to a region where we can never remember to have been before — to experience all this we must listen to symphonies such as...
Page 332 - But the angel of the Lord came down into the oven together with Azarias and his fellows, and smote the flame of the fire out of the oven ; and made the midst of the furnace as it had been a moist whistling wind, so that the fire touched them not at all, neither hurt nor troubled them.
Page 228 - The symphony, then, has had an influence on us such as none since Beethoven's have ever exercised. Artists and amateurs joined in extolling its merits, and I heard some words spoken by the master who had studied the work most elaborately, so as to ensure a grand performance and interpretation of so gorgeous a work — words which I should like to have been able to convey to Schubert, as perhaps conveying to him a message which would have given him the sincerest pleasure. Years perhaps will pass before...
Page 326 - Ballet Air, No. 9,' which we had already acquired in 1866, we had found at Mr Spina's an entr'acte after the second act, and a ' Hirten-Melodie ' for clarinets, bassoons and horns; but we still required the accompaniments to the Romance and the two choruses, as well as the total number of pieces and their sequence in the drama. To quit Vienna without these would have been too cruel, and yet neither from Dr Schneider nor Mr Spina, nor in the library of the...
Page 225 - Often, when looking on Vienna from the mountain heights, I thought how many times the restless eye of Beethoven may have scanned that distant Alpine range, how dreamily Mozart may have watched the course of the Danube, which seems to thread its way through every grove and forest, and how often Father Haydn looked at the spire of St. Stephen and felt unsteady whilst gazing at such a dizzy height.
Page 228 - ... as any unusual thing we look on for the first time in our lives; but there ever remains that delicious feeling which we get from some lovely legend or fairy story ; we sense, above all, that the composer was master of his subject, and that the mysteries of his music will be made clear to us in time. "The transition from this to the Allegro is entirely new ; the tempo does not seem to vary; we are landed, we know not how. The anal\^iof the movements piece by piece is neither a grateful task to...

References from web pages

Internet Archive Search: subject:"franz"
The life of Franz Schubert (Volume 1) - Kreissle von Hellborn, Heinrich, d. 1869 22 Keywords: Schubert, Franz, 1797-1828 Downloads: 37 ...
www.archive.org/ search.php?query=subject%3A%22franz%22

JSTOR: Whose Schubert?
'4Quoted in George Lowell Austin, The Life of Franz Schubert (Boston, 1873), p. 142. 15Newman Flower, Franz Schubert: The Man and His Circle (New York, ...
links.jstor.org/ sici?sici=0148-2076(199322)17%3A1%3C94%3AWS%3E2.0.CO%3B2-G

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