Stealing Secrets, Telling Lies: How Spies and Codebreakers Helped Shape the Twentieth Century

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Potomac Books, Incorporated, Aug 1, 2002 - History - 352 pages
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How important is it to know your enemy's secrets? The German victory at the Battle of Tannenberg in 1914, the entrance of the United States into World War I, the defeat of Nazi Germany, and the Soviet Union's faster-than-anticipated development of the atomic bomb were all facilitated by stealing enemy secrets. Espionage and codebreaking have, throughout history, been instrumental in the rise, fall, and preservation of world powers. In STEALING SECRETS, TELLING LIES James Gannon provides the full story behind the critical intelligence breakthroughs that helped alter the course of history in the twentieth century. The interception of the Zimmerman Telegram, the deciphering of the German Enigma machine, the Soviet's damaging penetration of the British Foreign Service through the "Cambridge Five" spy ring, and the U.S. counterintelligence coup known as Operation Venona (still secret until 1995) are just some of the episodes detailed here.

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Stealing secrets, telling lies: how spies and codebreakers helped shape the twentieth century

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Quality intelligence is vital to effective decision-making, and this book reviews some of the crucial personalities and operations that helped shape our world. World War II was the central event of ... Read full review

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About the author (2002)

James Gannon is a former producer and writer at NBC News. In the early 1980s he produced four one-hour documentaries that won numerous awards, including two for economic reporting. The Reckless Presidency of George W. Bush is his fourth non-fiction book. He is a graduate of Gonzaga University and earned a Masters degree in political science from American University in Washington, DC. He has two adult sons and five grandchildren.

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