Elementary engineering fracture mechanics

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, Jan 1, 1986 - Science - 469 pages
1 Review
When asked to start teaching a course on engineering fracture mechanics, I realized that a concise textbook, giving a general oversight of the field, did not exist. The explanation is undoubtedly that the subject is still in a stage of early development, and that the methodologies have still a very limited applicability. It is not possible to give rules for general application of fracture mechanics concepts. Yet our comprehension of cracking and fracture beha viour of materials and structures is steadily increasing. Further developments may be expected in the not too distant future, enabling useful prediction of fracture safety and fracture characteristics on the basis of advanced fracture mechanics procedures. The user of such advanced procedures m\lst have a general understanding of the elementary concepts, which are provided by this volume. Emphasis was placed on the practical application of fracture mechanics, but it was aimed to treat the subject in a way that may interest both metallurgists and engineers. For the latter, some general knowledge of fracture mechanisms and fracture criteria is indispensable for an apprecia tion of the limita tions of fracture mechanics. Therefore a general discussion is provided on fracture mechanisms, fracture criteria, and other metal lurgical aspects, without going into much detail. Numerous references are provided to enable a more detailed study of these subjects which are still in a stage of speculative treatment.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: Elementary Engineering Fracture Mechanics

User Review  - Ambuj Kumar - Goodreads

it is compulsory for material engineer. Read full review

Contents

Summary of basic problems and concepts
3
12 A crack in a structure
6
13 The stress at a crack tip
8
14 The Griffith criterion
15
15 The crack opening displacement criterion
17
16 Crack propagation
18
17 Closure
22
Mechanisms of fracture and crack growth
24
99 Measurement of JK and JR
240
910 Closure
245
Fatigue crack propagation
250
103 Factors affecting crack propagation
256
104 Variable amplitude service loading
262
105 Retardation models
266
106 Similitude
271
107 Small cracks
278

22 Cleavage fracture
31
23 Ductile fracture
38
24 Fatigue cracking
48
25 Environment assisted cracking
59
26 Service failure analysis
62
The elastic cracktip stress field
67
32 Complex stress functions
68
33 Solution to crack problems
69
34 The effect of finite size
73
35 Special cases
77
36 Elliptical cracks
80
37 Some useful expressions
86
The crack tip plastic zone
91
42 The Dugdale approach
94
43 The shape of the plastic zone
96
44 Plane stress versus plane strain
101
45 Plastic constraint factor
105
46 The thickness effect
107
The energy principle
115
52 The criterion for crack growth
119
53 The crack resistance R curve
122
54 Compliance
127
55 The J integral
131
56 Tearing modulus
136
57 Stability
137
Dynamics and crack arrest
142
62 The dynamic stress intensity and elastic energy release rate
147
63 Crack branching
150
64 The principles of crack arrest
155
65 Crack arrest in practice
162
66 Dynamic fracture toughness
165
Plane strain fracture toughness
170
72 Size requirements
174
73 Nonlinearity
177
74 Applicability
181
Plane stress and transitional behaviour
185
83 The R curve concept
193
84 The thickness effect
199
85 Plane stress testing
208
86 Closure
216
Elasticplastic fracture
219
92 The crack tip opening displacement
221
93 The possible use of the CTOD criterion
224
94 Experimental determination of CTOD
225
95 Parameters affecting the critical CTOD
228
96 Limitations fracture at general yield
231
97 Use of the J integral
235
98 Limitations of the J integral
237
108 Closure
282
Fracture resistance of materials
288
112 Fatigue cracking criteria
295
113 The effect of alloying and second phase particles
297
114 Effect of processing anisotropy
304
115 Effect of temperature
309
116 Closure
311
APPLICATIONS
315
Failsafety and damage tolerance
317
122 Means to provide failsafety
318
123 Required information for fracture mechanics approach
323
124 Closure
326
Determination of stress intensity factors
328
133 Finite element methods
330
134 Experimental methods
338
Practical problems
347
143 Corner cracks at holes
352
144 Cracks approaching holes
356
145 Combined loading
359
146 Fatigue crack growth under mixed mode loading
366
147 Biaxial loading
369
148 Fracture toughness of weldments
371
149 Service failure analysis
374
Fracture of structures
377
152 Pressure vessels and pipelines
378
153 Leakbeforebreak criterion
388
154 Material selection
392
155 The use of the J integral for structural analysis
396
156 Collapse analysis
399
157 Accuracy of fracture calculations
404
Stiffened sheet structures
408
162 Analysis
409
163 Fatigue crack propagation
413
164 Residual strength
415
165 The R curve and the residual strength of stiffened panels
422
166 Other analysis methods
425
167 Crack arrest
427
168 Closure
431
Prediction of fatigue crack growth
434
172 The load spectrum
435
173 Approximation of the stress spectrum
437
174 Generation of a stress history
439
175 Crack growth integration
441
176 Accuracy of predictions
447
177 Safety factors
452
Author Index
455
Subject Index
462
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 345 - Stress Intensity Factors for a Single-Edge-Notch Tension Specimen by Boundary Collocation of a Stress Function," NASA Technical Note D-2395, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1964.
Page 287 - Atanmo, P., Kumble, R. and McEvily, AJ 'Crack opening displacement and the rate of fatigue crack growth', Int.

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information