Picture-Perfect Mom

Front Cover
Harlequin, May 1, 2009 - Fiction - 256 pages
0 Reviews

Only in Hollywood would someone like Mac McGannon fall for someone like Morgana Carlyle. After all, he's a struggling miner trying to be a single dad and she's a celebrity who's been on magazine covers. She's so gorgeous, Mac's little girl is convinced Morgana is a princess. And everyone knows princesses aren't parent material.

Or are they? Because his daughter has already decided Morgana would make the perfect mom--for her. And Mac has to admit it's not hard to picture himself with Morgana in a forever kind of way. There's just one problem: Morgana is definitely not who she says she is.

  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
7
Section 2
20
Section 3
42
Section 4
53
Section 5
61
Section 6
73
Section 7
88
Section 8
105
Section 11
148
Section 12
158
Section 13
171
Section 14
182
Section 15
197
Section 16
215
Section 17
233
Section 18
249

Section 9
119
Section 10
135

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)



Debra Salonen wrote her first screenplay at age 11 for the television series Flipper. The plot involved the older brother's romantic interest in a young girl, presumably Debra. The story˙- like Debra's showbiz career˙- never evolved past the "what if?" stage, but Debra's addiction to writing has never faltered.

"I've always found a way to incorporate writing into any job I happened to hold at the time...well, except for my stint as a flaxseed counter in college," she said dryly. "Don't ask˙- it wasn't pretty."

As an aide in a preschool, she went from distributing milk and cookies to writing the monthly newsletter. Her stringer work for a local newspaper turned into a full-time position as a feature writer and assistant editor. Salonen says that exposure to human-interest stories fed her writer's soul, laying the groundwork for a wealth of imaginary characters and situations.

"Modern fiction provides the medium to touch people's lives. If your characters are real, in the sense they face real problems and possess real hopes, wants, needs and flaws, people can identify with them. My stories are about imperfect people who must learn life's lessons, heal old wounds and find inner forgiveness before they can truly love another person. I think these are universal themes most people, men and women, can relate to."

Salonen, who lives in the foothills near Yosemite, credits the support of her family with a hand in her success. "My ivory tower is on the second floor of our house. My son recently used an extension ladder to hang a wind-chime outside my window to encourage the creative spirits to stop by for a visit."

She also recognizes the value of networking and associating with fellow writers. "The first hurdle you face as a writer is admitting you are one˙- like any other addiction."

"I'm thrilled by the validation publication provides, but I also feel a sense of accomplishment for all those people who have helped me learn my craft and encouraged me to believe in myself. Writing is a team effort directed by life experience, associations, imagination, and spiritual connectedness," Salonen said.

Salonen is currently at work on two new projects for the Superromance line. Her Flipper screenplay is on the shelf collecting dust˙- right where it belongs.

Bibliographic information