Colonial Frontiers: Indigenous-European Encounters in Settler Societies

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Lynette Russell
Manchester University Press, Aug 10, 2001 - History - 247 pages
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This study explores the formation, structure and maintenance of boundaries and frontiers in settler colonies. Drawing on the work of anthropologists, historians, archaeologists and post-colonial theorists, the authors explore the importance of cross-cultural interactions in the settler-colonies of Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and America. Taking key historical moments to illuminate the formation of new boundaries and the interaction between the settler societies and the indigenous groups this book raises questions about how Empire worked on the ground. The collection attempts to theorize the indigenous experience.
  

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Contents

Introduction Lynette Russell
1
The northern Cape frontier zone in South African frontier
19
temporal frontiers and boundaries
47
the London Missionary Society
68
Benjamin Franklin and
82
Central Queensland 184563
101
the Treaty of Waitangi and
119
E J Eyre and sexual politics
134
possibilities and precariousness along
151
Torres Strait Islanders and the maritime frontier in early
175
the problem
198
Alls not quiet on the western front rethinking resistance
216
Select bibliography
237
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About the author (2001)

Lynette Russell is Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Australian Indigenous Studies at Monash University.

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