The Pig That Wants to Be Eaten: 100 Experiments for the Armchair Philosopher (Google eBook)

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Penguin, Jun 27, 2006 - Games - 320 pages
68 Reviews
Both entertaining and startling, The Pig That Wants to Be Eaten offers one hundred philosophical puzzles that stimulate thought on a host of moral, social, and personal dilemmas. Taking examples from sources as diverse as Plato and Steven Spielberg, author Julian Baggini presents abstract philosophical issues in concrete terms, suggesting possible solutions while encouraging readers to draw their own conclusions:

Lively, clever, and thought-provoking, The Pig That Wants to Be Eaten is a portable feast for the mind that is sure to satisfy any intellectual appetite.

  

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Review: The Pig That Wants to Be Eaten: 100 Experiments for the Armchair Philosopher

User Review  - Maddie - Goodreads

Excellent introductory book for those wanting to tiptoe into philosophy. Read full review

Review: The Pig That Wants to Be Eaten: 100 Experiments for the Armchair Philosopher

User Review  - Philip Stirups - Goodreads

Julian Baggini's book is interesting enough with some discussion into philosophical debates/ideas. However the brevity of each article is also its downfall. In lots of places the discussions are superficial and end rather abruptly. Would not recommend. Read full review

Contents

More or less
154
Double trouble
157
The elusive I
160
Sustainable development
163
The total perspective vortex
166
Eating Tiddles
169
Divine command
172
The eyes have it
175

Bigger Brother
25
The veil of ignorance
28
The ship Theseus
31
Picasso on the beach
34
Black white and red all over
37
Bank error in your favour
40
Ordinary heroism
43
Racing tortoises
46
The torture option
49
Rationality demands
52
Bursting the soap bubble
55
Condemned to life
58
Land of the Epiphens
61
The lifeboat
64
The beetle in the box
67
Squaring the circle
70
Buridans an ass
73
Pains remains
76
Duties done
79
The nightmare scenario
82
Life dependency
85
Memories are made of this
88
Just so
91
Free Simone
94
The freespeech booth
97
Dont blame me
100
Last resort
103
Preemptive justice
106
Nature the artist
109
I am a brain
112
The Chinese Room
115
The rockinghorse winner
118
Getting the blues
121
Take the money and run
124
Future shock
127
Till death us do part
130
The invisible gardener
133
Amoebaesque
136
Rabbit
139
Evil genius
142
The hole in the sum of the parts
145
The good bribe
148
Living in a vat
151
Do as I say not as I do
178
Mozzarella moon
181
I think therefore?
184
No know
187
Nipping the bud
190
Soul power
193
The forger
196
The poppadom paradox
199
Mad pain
202
The horror
205
An inspector calls
208
Life support
211
Free Percy
214
Being a bat
217
Water water everywhere
220
The ring of Gyges
223
Net head
226
The scapegoat
229
Gambling on God
232
A Clockwork Orange
235
Hearts and heads
238
Sense and sensibility
241
The freeloader
244
The golden rule
247
The pleasure principle
250
The nowhere man
253
Art for arts sake
256
Fair inequality
259
Total lack of recall
262
Kill and let die
265
Something we know not what
268
No one gets hurt
271
Autogovernment
274
Zombies
277
The Sorites tax
280
The problem of evil
283
Family first
286
Moral luck
289
The experience machine
292
Give peace a chance?
295
The Nest café
298
Index
301
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Julian Baggini is a British philosopher and writer. He is the author of Welcome to Everytown and The Pig that Wants to be Eaten and is a co-founder and editor of The Philosophers' Magazine. He has written for The Guardian, The Independent and many other publications, and is a regular guest on BBC Radio 4.

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