Strategic Navigation: A Systems Approach to Business Strategy

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ASQ Quality Press, Jan 1, 2003 - Business & Economics - 302 pages
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There are many parallels between the business world and the military world: both must always be wary of the competition; both must be able to adapt to rapidly changing conditions; and if either falters the results could be devastating. Yet while military leaders have employed essentially the same strategies for thousands of years, business leaders often feel the need to try the latest fad in an effort to capture lightning in a bottle and lead the company to success. In Strategic Navigation: a Systems Approach to Business Strategy, best-selling author H. William Dettmer explains how sound, proven strategies used by great military leaders from Sun Tzu to Schwarzkopf can also be easily and effectively used in the business world. Dettmer begins the book by introducing the conceptual framework of military strategy and maneuver warfare, which dates back over 2,300 years to the time of Sun Tzues the Art of War. He first explains how the time-tested principles of war planning and military execution can be readily applied to non-military uses, such as commercial business, not-for-profit organizations, and government agencies, leading to considerable benefits in coherence and focus. Dettmer then introduces a logical, systematic tool set to help you translate the military strategy etemplatee into action, which can then be applied to nearly any industry or business type. the system described by Dettmer is quick and easy to use, flexible enough to accommodate changes in the external environment, and supports the creativity of both strategists and executors.
  

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Contents

Traditional Strategic Planning
1
THE FAILURE OF STRATEGIC PLANNING
3
TO PLAN PLANNING AND PLANS
4
PROS AND CONS
7
PROS AND CONS
8
The Hoshin Strategic Model
11
PLANNING
12
REVIEWING
13
REVIEWING THE BIG PICTURE
110
RESISTANCE TO CHANGE
111
Creating a Transformation Resolving Conflict
113
THE INHERENT NATURE OF CONFLICT IN CHANGE
114
THREE DIMENSIONS OF FEASIBILITY
116
EFRATS CLOUD
117
POWER ISSUES
120
THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CHANGE AND POWER
123

STRATEGY FORMATION
15
THE BUREAUCRACY PITFALL
16
TOO LITTLE DETAIL OR TOO MUCH? A WAY OUT OF THE DILEMMA
17
CONCLUSION
18
The Military Strategic Planning Model
19
HOW THE MILITARY DOES PLANNING
20
STRENGTHS OF THE MILITARY PLANNING SYSTEM
23
WEAKNESSES OF THE MILITARY PLANNING SYSTEM
25
BOYDS THEORY OF MANEUVER WARFARE
27
CONCLUSION
31
The Constraint Management Model
33
PROBLEMS WITH THE HOSHIN APPROACH
35
PROBLEMS WITH THE MILITARY APPROACH
36
STRATEGIC NAVIGATION
37
DEFINING STRATEGY
39
DELIBERATE EMERGENT OR A COMBINATION?
41
ANALYSIS AND SYNTHESIS
42
A SYNTHESIS OF THEORIES
43
THE CONSTRAINT MANAGEMENT MODEL
44
SEVEN STEPS OF THE CONSTRAINT MANAGEMENT MODEL
46
A LOGICAL STRATEGY DEVELOPMENT PROCESS
48
THE LOGICAL TOOLS OF THE CONSTRAINT MANAGEMENT MODEL
49
MANEUVER WARFARE THE OODA LOOP AND THE CONSTRAINT MANAGEMENT MODEL
51
CYCLE TIME
52
COMPETITIVE AND NONCOMPETITIVE ENVIRONMENTS
53
SUMMARY
54
Defining the Paradigm System Boundary Goal Critical Success Factors and Measures of Progress
57
GOAL OBJECTIVE OR MISSION?
58
THE GOAL
59
CRITICAL SUCCESS FACTORS NECESSARY CONDITIONS
60
TWO TYPES OF NECESSARY CONDITIONS
61
FEW BUT CRITICAL
62
GOAL OR NECESSARY CONDITION? MAKING THE RIGHT SELECTION
63
MEASURING PROGRESS TOWARD THE GOAL
67
CONSTRAINT MANAGEMENT MEASURES
68
THE USE OF SURROGATES
69
THE STRATEGIC INTERMEDIATE OBJECTIVES IO MAP
70
A POSTMORTEM
72
TEMPLATES
74
CONCLUSION
77
Knowledge Creativity and Idea Generation
79
KNOWLEDGE
80
COMPLEXITY
82
THE ROLE OF KNOWLEDGE IN STRATEGY AND EXECUTION
83
THE JOHARI WINDOW
84
RELEVANCE OF AN ANALYSIS PROCESS TO THE FOUR STATES OF KNOWLEDGE
86
SOURCES OF KNOWLEDGE FOR A STRATEGIC ANALYSIS
88
SIZE VERSUS MANEUVERABILITY
89
HOW TO BREAK THE CHAINS CONSTRAINING CREATIVITY
90
THE CRAWFORD SLIP METHOD
91
AN EXAMPLE
92
CONCLUSION
93
Analyzing the Mismatches
95
TERROR ATTACKS AND AMERICAS AIRLINES
98
COMPARING TODAYS PERFORMANCE AGAINST FUTURE REQUIREMENTS
99
THE BASICS OF CAUSE AND EFFECT
106
ARCHIMEDES POINTS
107
HOW TO CONSTRUCT A PICTURE OF THE STATUS QUO
108
THE EVAPORATING CLOUD
126
THE STRATEGIC EVAPORATING CLOUD
129
CONSTRUCTING AN EVAPORATING CLOUD
131
Sun Tzu and the Art of Modern Combat
135
LEVELS OF ENGAGEMENT
136
Operations
137
ATTRIBUTES OF STRATEGICALLY RESPONSIVE FORCES
139
Deployability
140
Versatility
141
Lethality
142
Sustainability
143
EVALUATING YOUR STRATEGY USING THE SEVEN ATTRIBUTES
144
Elements of Combat Power
145
Evaluating Your Capability to Execute Strategy
147
Principles of War
148
Evaluating Strategy Using the Principles of War
149
Tenets of Military Operations
150
Evaluating Operations Using the Tenets of Military Operations
152
OPERATIONAL FRAMEWORK
153
Designing the Future Laying Out Strategy
157
FRAMING STRATEGY
158
THE INITIATORS OF STRATEGY EXECUTION
160
HOW TO CONSTRUCT A STRATEGIC FUTURE REALITY TREE
161
CREATING THE PICTURE TO PUT INTO THE FRAME
171
METTTC
172
GATHERING INPUTS FOR METTTC
173
SEQUENCE NOT TIME
175
BULLETPROOFING THE STRATEGIC FUTURE REALITY TREE
178
THE DYNAMIC NATURE OF STRATEGY
179
SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION
182
Planning the Execution
183
THE PREREQUISITE TREE
184
AN EXAMPLE
188
HOW TO CONSTRUCT A PREREQUISITE TREE
190
FLESHING OUT THE PREREQUISITE TREE
192
PROJECTIZING THE PREREQUISITE TREES
193
CRITICAL CHAIN PROJECT SCHEDULING
194
THE METAPROJECT
197
Putting It All Together
199
DEFINE THE PARADIGM
200
ANALYZE THE MISMATCHES
201
PLAN THE EXECUTION
202
DEPLOY THE STRATEGY
204
REVIEW THE STRATEGY
207
MEASURING SYSTEM SUCCESS
208
NOTFORPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS AND GOVERNMENT AGENCIES
209
CONCLUSION
211
The Crawford Slip Method
215
US Transportation Command
229
Wurtzberg Corporation
235
Olympic AquaVentures
253
Strategic Conflicts Examples
273
Strategic Wisdom1
283
Glossary
289
Bibliography
293
Index
297
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