The Tree of Life: A Phylogenetic Classification

Front Cover
Harvard University Press, 2006 - Science - 560 pages
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Did you know that you are more closely related to a mushroom than to a daisy? That crocodiles are closer to birds than to lizards? That dinosaurs are still among us? That the terms "fish," "reptiles," and "invertebrates" do not indicate scientific groupings? All this is the result of major changes in classification, whose methods have been totally revisited over the last thirty years.

Modern classification, based on phylogeny, no longer places humans at the center of nature. Groups of organisms are no longer defined by their general appearance, but by their different individual characteristics. Phylogeny, therefore, by showing common ancestry, outlines a tree of evolutionary relationships from which one can retrace the history of life.

This book diagrams the tree of life according to the most recent methods of classification. By showing how life forms arose and developed and how they are related, The Tree of Life presents a key to the living world in all its dazzling variety.,

  

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Contents

Preface
5
Introduction
11
Life
48
Eubacteria
52
Archaea 80
54
Eukaryotes 98
56
Chlorobionta 148
108
Embryophyta
164
Deuterostomia
324
Sarcopterygii
347
Mammalia 388
372
Primates 478
432
Actinopterygii
502
Appendixes
517
Sequenced Genomes
533
General Bibliography
537

Metazoa
196
Protostomia
216
Mollusca 268
234
Euarthropoda 300
257

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About the author (2006)

Guillaume Lecointre is Professor and Research Scientist at the Muséum National dâe(tm)Histoire Naturelle, Paris.

Hervé Le Guyader is a Professor of Evolutionary Biology at the University of Pierre and Marie Curie, Paris.

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