Narrative of a Second Voyage in Search of a North-west Passage, and of a Residence in the Arctic Regions During the Years 1829, 1830, 1831, 1832, 1833, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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A.W. Webster, 1835 - Arctic regions
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Page 447 - ... wind. On the 25th we crossed Navy Board Inlet, and on the following morning, to our inexpressible joy, we descried a ship in the offing, becalmed, which proved to be the Isabella, of Hull, the same ship which I commanded in 1818. At noon we reached her, when her enterprising commander, who had in vain searched for us in Prince Regent's Inlet, after giving us three cheers, received us with every demonstration of kindness and hospitality which humanity could dictate. I ought to mention also that...
Page 447 - ... degrees below zero, immediately took the consistency of ice, and thus we actually became the inhabitants of an iceberg during one of the most severe winters hitherto recorded; our sufferings aggravated by want of bedding, clothing, and animal food, need not be dwelt upon. Mr. C. Thomas, the carpenter, was the only man who perished at this beach, but three others, besides one who had lost his foot, were reduced to the last stage of debility, and only thirteen of our number were able to carry provisions...
Page 354 - We were weary for want of occupation, for want of variety, for want of the means of mental exertion, for want of thought, and (why should I not say it ?) for want of society. To-day was as yesterday and as was to-day, so would be to-morrow...
Page 447 - America, in latitude 73, 56, and longitude 90 west. From the summit of the lofty mountain on the promontory we could see Prince Regent's Inlet, Barrow's Strait, and Lancaster Sound, which presented one impenetrable mass of ice, just as I had seen it in 1818. Here we remained in a state of anxiety and suspense which may be easier imagined than described. All our attempts to push through were vain ; at length, being forced, by want of provisions, and the approach of a very severe winter, to return...
Page 448 - The discovery of the Gulf of Boothia, the continent and isthmus of Boothia Felix, and a vast number of islands, rivers, and lakes ; the undeniable establishment that the north-east point of America extends to the 74th degree of north latitude ; valuable observations of every kind, but particularly on the magnet; and, to crown all, we have had the honour of placing the illustrious name of our most gracious Sovereign William IV. on the true position of the magnetic pole.
Page 450 - I have received and laid before my Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty your letter of the...
Page 451 - Sir, Having laid before my Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, your letter of the...
Page 447 - ... and it was not until the 1st of July that we reached the beach, completely exhausted by hunger and fatigue. " A hut was speedily constructed, and the boats, three of which had been washed off the beach, but providentially driven on shore again, were repaired during this month; but the unusual heavy appearance of the ice afforded...
Page 438 - Night at length brought quiet and serious thoughts, and I trust there was not a man among us who did not then express, where it was due, his gratitude for that interposition which had raised us all from a despair which none could now forget, and had brought us from the very borders of a most distant grave, to life and friends and civilization.
Page 333 - Sinbad, that it even was a mountain of iron, or a magnet as large as Mont Blanc. But nature had here erected no monument to denote the spot which she had chosen as the centre of one of her great and dark powers...

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