The Nature and Logic of Capitalism

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W. W. Norton & Company, Sep 17, 1986 - Business & Economics - 225 pages
7 Reviews

In The Worldly Philosophers, Robert Heilbroner set out to describe what the great economists thought would happen to the system of capitalism. In later books. Professor Heilbroner projected his own views about the future of the capitalist system. Now he asks a still more demanding question: What is capitalism?

In search of an answer, The Nature and Logic of Capitalism takes us on a far-ranging exploration to the unconscious levels of the human psyche and the roots of domination and submission; to the organization of primitive society and the origins of wealth; to the sources of profit and the conception of a "regime" of capital; to the interplay of relatively slow-changing institutions and the powerful force of the accumulation of wealth. By the end of this tour we have grappled not only with ideas of Adam Smith and Karl Marx but with Freud and modern anthropologists as well. And we are far closer to understanding capitalism in our time, its possibilities and limits.
  

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Review: The Nature and Logic of Capitalism

User Review  - Tom - Goodreads

This was good and thought-provoking if occasionally pretentious and overwritten! Read full review

Review: The Nature and Logic of Capitalism

User Review  - Mwaseemn - Goodreads

Excellent book. Describes the title with great lucidity without losing the profound message it intends to convey. One aspect that I felt was missing and would have made the book even better was ... Read full review

Contents

Preface
9
The Drive to Amass Capital
33
The Regime of Capital
53
4
78
The Ideology of Capital 707
107
The Logic of Capitalist Development
141
1
152
The Limits of Social Analysis
180
Bibliography
209
Index
215
Copyright

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About the author (1986)

Robert L. Heilbroner was Norman Thomas Professor of Economics at the New School for Social Research and author of The Worldly Philosophers and many other books.

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