Spain in Italy: Politics, Society, and Religion 1500-1700

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Thomas James Dandelet, John A. Marino, American Academy in Rome
BRILL, 2007 - Political Science - 594 pages
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Nuanced understanding of the reciprocal nature of Spanish-Italian relations and the rich cultural production that was the product of the far-reaching exchanges between the two peninsulas throughout the early modern period guides the nineteen essays in this volume. The key political reality of sixteenth and seventeenth-century Spanish imperial domination in Italy formal (Sicily, Sardinia, Naples, Milan), informal (Rome, Genoa, Tuscany), and more neutral or independent (Venice) introduces the investigation in this volume into the methods and mechanisms of control and collaboration, cooperation and cooptation, assimilation and resistance. The connections between topics and problems in social, administrative, economic, and cultural history follow from political theory and practice. Politics, society, economy, and religion help us see both Spain and Italy more clearly.
  

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Contents

INTRODUCTION Thomas James Dandelet and John A Marino
1
PART ONE STATES UNDER SPANISH RULE
21
PART TWO SPANISH INFLUENCE IN THE ITALIAN STATES
133
PART THREE SOCIETY ADMINISTRATION AND ECONOMY
249
PART FOUR RELIGION AND THE CHURCH
431
INDEX OF PROPER NAMES
569
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Thomas James Dandelet Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, is Associate Professor of history at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of Spanish Rome, 1500-1700 (Yale, 2001) and other publications on Renaissance Italy, the Spanish Empire, and the Mediterranean world.John A. Marino, Ph.D., University of Chicago (1977) is a Historian at the University of California, San Diego, with publications on the early modern Mediterranean world, Spanish Italy, the city and kingdom of Naples, and the Italian South.