A History of the West Indies, Containing the Natural, Civil, and Ecclesiastical History of Each Island: With an Account of the Missions Instituted in Those Islands, from the Commencement of Their Civilization : But More Especially of the Missions which Have Been Established in that Archipelago by the Society Late in Connexion with the Rev. John Wesley (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Nuttall, Fisher, and Dixon, 1811 - Haiti
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 26 - Then they that feared the Lord spake often one to another ; and the Lord hearkened, and heard it : and a book of remembrance was written before him for them that feared the Lord, and that thought upon his name.
Page 326 - Unshaken, unseduced, unterrified, His loyalty he kept, his love, his zeal ; Nor number nor example with him wrought To swerve from truth, or change his constant mind, Though single.
Page 192 - The haunt of seals, and ores, and sea-mews' clang ; To teach thee that God attributes to place No sanctity, if none be thither brought By men who there frequent, or therein dwell. And now, what further shall ensue, behold.
Page 10 - This dreadful tragedy ended, when it happens in a town, the devastation is surveyed with accumulated horror : the harbour is covered •with wrecks of boats and vessels ; and the shore has not a vestige of its former state remaining. Mounds of rubbish and rafters in one place, heaps of earth and trunks of trees in another, deep gullies from torrents of water, and the dead and dying bodies of men, women, and children, half buried, and scattered about, where streets but a few hours before were, present...
Page 442 - Mons. and Madame Baillon, their daughter and son-in-law, and two white servants, residing on a mountain plantation about thirty miles from Cape Francois, were apprized of the revolt by one of their own slaves, who was himself in the conspiracy, but promised, if possible to save the lives of his master and his family. Having no immediate means of providing for their escape, he conducted them into an adjacent wood; after which he went and joined the revolters. The following night, he found an opportunity...
Page 9 - But a dreadful reverse succeeds: the sky is suddenly overcast and wild ; the sea rises at once from a profound calm into mountains; the wind rages and roars like the noise of cannon; the rain descends in...
Page 442 - Francois, were apprized of the revolt by one of their own slaves, who was himself in the conspiracy, but promised, if possible to save the lives of his master and his family. Having no immediate means of providing for their escape, he conducted them into an adjacent wood; after which he went and joined the revolters. The following night, he found an opportunity of bringing them provisions from the rebel camp. The second night he returned again, with a further supply of provisions; but declared that...
Page 10 - ... distances from their walls, which are beaten to the ground, burying their inhabitants under them — large trees are torn up by the roots, and huge branches shivered off, and driven through the air in every direction, with immense velocity — every tree and shrub that withstands the shock, is stripped of its boughs and foliage — plants and grass are laid flat on the earth — luxuriant spring is changed in a moment to dreary winter.
Page 435 - By this decree it was declared and enacted, " that the people of colour resident in the French colonies, born of free parents, were entitled to, as of right, and should be allowed the enjoyment of, all the privileges of French citizens, and, among others, to those of having votes in the choice of representatives, and of being eligible to seats both in the parochial and colonial assemblies.
Page 229 - ... stock sufficient to allow him to pass his latter days in quiet; and lastly, to indemnify every inhabitant of Bermuda who shall have been oppressed, either by the minister or the magistrate.

Bibliographic information