Law in the Sociological Enterprise: A Reconstruction

Front Cover
Westview Press, 1994 - Law - 240 pages
0 Reviews
Few would dispute the notion that law has a tremendous impact on modern life. But social scientists who study the dynamics of family, work, medicine, and other institutions often ignore the pervasive influence of law. This introduction to the legal world and the sociology of law shows how social scientists can better account for the influences of legal issues in a wide range of social settings.

Incorporating historical and cross-cultural research in her book, Lisa McIntyre explains the general effects of law on interpersonal relations, the concept of a civil contract, and the relationship of law to social norms. Discussing the reasons some societies and some domains within societies have more law than others, she shows that, contrary to popular wisdom, law is not only a reflection of social values but also fundamental to the formation of those values.

  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Related books

Contents

PART
1
A Sociological Conception of Law
9
Law and Social Relationships
31
The Civil Domain and Nonpersons
47
The Civil Domain in Society
67
Social and Legal Expectations
95
The Constitutive Effects of Law
109
PART
137
The Civil Contract and Working Life in the United States
167
Final Words
205
Bibliography
211
Cases Cited
225
About the Book and Author
231
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 124 - That all persons within the jurisdiction of the United States shall be entitled to the full and equal enjoyment of the accommodations, advantages, facilities, and privileges of inns, public conveyances on land or water, theatres, and other places of public amusement...
Page 162 - It is cardinal with us that the custody, care and nurture of the child reside first in the parents, whose primary function and freedom include preparation for obligations the state can neither supply nor hinder.
Page 157 - It is better for all the world, if instead of waiting to execute degenerate offspring for crime, or to let them starve for their imbecility, society can prevent those who are manifestly unfit from continuing their kind. The principle that sustains compulsory vaccination is broad enough to cover cutting the Fallopian tubes. . . . Three generations of imbeciles are enough.
Page 126 - A statute which implies merely a legal distinction between the white and colored races — a distinction which is founded in the color of the two races, and which must always exist so long as white men are distinguished from the other race by color — has no tendency to destroy the legal equality of the two races, or reestablish a state of involuntary servitude.
Page 126 - We conclude that in the field of public education the doctrine of 'separate but equal
Page 117 - The intensity and complexity of life, attendant upon advancing civilization, have rendered necessary some retreat from the world, and man, under the refining influence of culture, has become more sensitive to publicity, so that solitude and privacy have become more essential to the individual...
Page 187 - Nothing contained in the antitrust laws shall be construed to forbid the existence and operation of labor, agricultural, or horticultural organizations, instituted for the purposes of mutual help, and not having capital stock or conducted for profit, or to forbid or restrain individual members of such organizations from lawfully carrying out the legitimate objects thereof; nor shall such organizations, or the members thereof, be held or construed to be illegal combinations or conspiracies in restraint...
Page 49 - people of the United States" and "citizens" are synonymous terms, and mean the same thing. They both describe the political body who, according to our republican institutions, form the sovereignty, and who hold the power and conduct the Government through their representatives. They are what we familiarly call the "sovereign people," and every citizen is one of this people, and a constituent member of this sovereignty.

References to this book

All Book Search results »

References from web pages

JSTOR: Law in the Sociological Enterprise: A Reconstruction.
Law in the Sociological Enterprise: A Reconstruction. Susan S. Silbey. Contemporary Sociology, Vol. 25, No. 3, 386-388. May, 1996. ...
links.jstor.org/ sici?sici=0094-3061(199605)25%3A3%3C386%3ALITSEA%3E2.0.CO%3B2-1

Vol. 7 No. 12 (December 1997) pp. 543-545. LAW IN THE SOCIOLOGICAL ...
LAW IN THE SOCIOLOGICAL ENTERPRISE: A RECONSTRUCTION by Lisa J mcintyre. Boulder: Westview Press, 1994. 240 pp. Reviewed by Robert Dingwall, ...
www.bsos.umd.edu/ gvpt/ lpbr/ subpages/ reviews/ mcintyre.htm

About the author (1994)

Lisa J. McIntyre is associate professor in sociology at Washington State University. She received the PhD in sociology from The University of Chicago. She is the author of three books including "The Public Defender: The Practice of Law in the Shadows of Repute"; "Law in the Sociological Enterprise" and "The Practical Skeptic: Core Concepts in Sociology" and the editor of "The Practical Skeptic: Readings in Sociology". With Marvin Sussman, McIntyre edited "Families and Law". An enthusiastic teacher and popular lecturer, McIntyre is a winner of Washington State University's William F. Mullen Teaching Medal and numerous departmental teaching awards. Her central research focus is on how law and social behavior interact.

Bibliographic information