Science and a Future Life: With Other Essays (Google eBook)

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Macmillan, 1901 - France - 243 pages
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Page 66 - Believing as I do that man in the distant future will be a far more perfect creature than he now is, it is an intolerable thought that he and all other sentient beings are doomed to complete annihilation after such long-continued slow progress.
Page 16 - Titanic forces taking birth In divers seasons, divers climes; For we are Ancients of the earth, And in the morning of the times.
Page 157 - OUT of the deep, my child, out of the deep, From that great deep, before our world begins, Whereon the Spirit of God moves as he will Out of the deep, my child, out of the deep, From that true world -within the world we see, Whereof our world is but the bounding shore...
Page 200 - Nay, but she airn'd not at glory, no lover of glory she : Give her the glory of going on, and still to be. The wages of sin is death : if the wages of Virtue be dust, Would she have heart to endure for the life of the worm and the fly?
Page 205 - The Ghost in Man, the Ghost that '. once was Man, But cannot wholly free itself from Man, Are calling to each other thro' a dawn Stranger than earth has ever seen ; the veil Is rending, and the Voices of the day Are heard across the Voices of the dark.
Page 149 - The dim and shadowy outlines of the superhuman deity fade slowly away from before us ; and as the mist of his presence floats aside, we perceive with greater and greater clearness the shape of a yet grander and nobler figure of Him who made all Gods, and shall unmake them.
Page 183 - We are not sure of sorrow, And joy was never sure; To-day will die to-morrow Time stoops to no man's lure; And love, grown faint and fretful, With lips but half regretful Sighs, and with eyes forgetful Weeps that no loves endure.
Page 58 - On the other hand, I cannot anyhow be contented to view this wonderful universe, and especially the nature of man, and to conclude that everything is the result of brute force. I am inclined to look at everything as resulting from designed laws, with the details, whether good or bad, left to the working out of what we may call chance. Not that this notion at all satisfies me.
Page 65 - With respect to immortality, nothing shows me [so clearly] how strong and almost instinctive a belief it is, as the consideration of the view now held by most physicists, namely, that the sun with all the planets will in time grow too cold for life, unless indeed some great body dashes into the sun, and thus gives it fresh life.
Page 69 - I suppose, have thus suffered; and if I had to live my life again, I would have made a rule to read some poetry and listen to some music at least once every week; for perhaps the parts of my brain now atrophied would thus have been kept active through use. The loss of these tastes is a loss of happiness, and may possibly be injurious to the intellect, and more probably to the moral character, by enfeebling the emotional part of our nature.

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