Thoughts on Executive Justice: With Respect to Our Criminal Laws, Particularly on the Circuits : Dedicated to the Judges of Assize and Recommended to the Perusal of All Magistrates and to All Persons who are Liable to Serve on Crown Juries (Google eBook)

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J. Dodsley, 1785 - Criminal justice, Administration of - 170 pages
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Page 33 - And Saul said, They have brought them from the Amalekites : for the people spared the best of the sheep and of the oxen, to sacrifice unto the LORD thy God ; and the rest we have utterly destroyed.
Page 136 - You shall well and truly try, and true deliverance make, between our Sovereign Lord the King and the prisoner at the bar, whom you shall have in charge, and a true verdict give, according to the evidence. So help you God.
Page 90 - In vain thefe dangers paft, your doors you clofe, And hope the balmy bleffings of repofe : Cruel with guilt, and daring with defpair, The midnight murd'rer burfts the faithlefs bar ; Invades the facred hour of filent reft, And plants, unfeen, a dagger in your breaft.
Page 90 - Scarce can our fields, fuch crowds at Tyburn die, With hemp the gallows and the fleet fupply. Propofe your fchemes, ye fenatorian band, Whofe ways and means fupport the finking land ; Left ropes be wanting in the tempting fpring, To rig another convoy for the k g.
Page 91 - ALFRED'S golden reign, Could half the nation's criminals contain ; Fair Juftice, then, without conftraint ador'd, Held high the fteady fcale, but fheath'd the fword ; No fpies were paid, no fpecial juries known-, Bleft age!
Page 121 - No man indeed of common humanity or common sense can think the life of a man and a few shillings to be of an equal consideration, or that the law in punishing theft with death proceeds (as perhaps a private person sometimes may) with any view to vengeance. The terror of the example is the only thing proposed, and one man is sacrificed to the preservation of thousands.
Page 60 - Marlborough and Prince Eugene commanded the allied army, a soldier in the division of the latter was condemned to be hanged for marauding. The man happened to be a favourite with his officers, who took great pains to save his life, and for this purpose interceded with the prince, who positively refused to grant their request.
Page 61 - at this rate we shall hang half the army ; I pardon a great many.' ' That,' replied the prince, ' is the reason that so much mischief is done by your people, and that so many suffer for it : I never pardon any, and therefore there are very few to be punished in my department.
Page 61 - The man happened to be a favourite with his officers, who took great pains to save his life, and for this purpose interceded with the prince, who positively refused to grant their request. They then applied to the Duke of Marlborough, begging his grace to interfere ; he accordingly went to Prince Eugene, who said ' he never did, and never would, consent to the pardon of a marauder.' ' Why,' said the duke, ' at this rate we shall hang half the army ; I pardon a great many.
Page 143 - Drunkenness is too frequently apparent where it ought of all things to be avoided. I mean in jurymen and witnesses. The heat of the court, joined to the fumes of the liquor, has laid many an honest juryman into a calm and profound sleep, and sometimes it has been no small trouble for his fellows to jog him into the verdict, even where a wretch's life has depended on the event.

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