Journal, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, 1894
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Page 81 - Yes, I am proud; I must be proud to see Men not afraid of God afraid of me: Safe from the Bar, the Pulpit, and the Throne, Yet touched and shamed by ridicule alone.
Page 102 - Were forc'd to own to him their obligation. He that could once have half a kingdom bought, In half a minute is not worth a groat. His coffers from the coffin could not save, Nor all his interest keep him from the grave.
Page 136 - You will suppose that with an upright path Your feet must struggle; in such bold ascent The pastoral mountains front you, face to face. But, courage ! for around that boisterous brook The mountains have all opened out themselves, And made a hidden valley of their own.
Page 88 - ... could find them ; yea, and one another soon after ; insomuch, as the very carcasses they spared not to scrape out of their graves, and if they found a plot of water-cresses or shamrocks, there they flocked as to a feast for the time, yet not able to continue there withal ; that in short space there was none almost left, and a most populous and plentiful country suddenly left void of man and beast.
Page 19 - The favourite in the betting-book was, of course, the eagle, who at once, and in full confidence of victory, commenced his flight towards the sun ; when he had vastly distanced all competitors, he proclaimed with a mighty voice his monarchy over all things that had wings. Suddenly, however, the wren, who had secreted himself under the...
Page 174 - THE pillar towers of Ireland, how wondrously they stand By the lakes and rushing rivers through the valleys of our land ; In mystic file, through the isle, they Lift their heads sublime, These gray old pillar temples, these conquerors of time...
Page 48 - I was a man retired from the amusement of politics, visits, and what the world calls pleasure. I had a little friend, educated always under mine own eye, whose painting delighted me, whose music ravished me, and whose lively, gay spirit was a continual feast. It has pleased God to take him hence. God, I say, in mercy hath deprived me of this pretty, gay plaything.
Page 89 - To ioyne in one ere to the sea they come; So flowing all from one, all one at last become.
Page 48 - ... mine own eye, whose painting delighted me, whose music ravished me, and whose lively, gay spirit was a continual feast. It has pleased God to take him hence. God, I say, in mercy hath deprived me of this pretty, gay plaything. His parts and person, his innocence and piety, his particularly uncommon affection for me, had gained too much upon me. Not content to be fond of him, I was vain of him. I had set my heart too much upon him more perhaps than I ought to have done upon anything in this...

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