American Visions: The Epic History of Art in America

Front Cover
Harvill Press, 1997 - Art - 635 pages
6 Reviews
Robert Hughes begins where American art itself began, with the Native Americans and the first Spanish invaders in the Southwest; he ends with the art of today. In between, in a scholarly text that crackles with wit, intelligence and insight, he tells the story of how American art developed. Hughes investigates the changing tastes of the American public; he explores the effects on art of America's landscape of unparalleled variety and richness; he examines the impact of the melting-pot of cultures that America has always been. Most of all he concentrates on the paintings and art objects themselves and on the men and women - from Winslow Homer and Thomas Eakins to Edward Hopper and Georgia O'Keeffe, from Arthur Dove and George Bellows to Jackson Pollock and Mark Rothko uawho created them. This is an uncompromising and refreshingly opinionated exploration of America, told through the lens of its art.

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Review: American Visions: The Epic History of Art in America

User Review  - Eric McLean - Goodreads

This is a great book for anyone looking to understand/appreciate/learn more about American art. Robert Hughes is a talented writer and I enjoyed reading between the lines on some of non-American humor ... Read full review

Review: American Visions: The Epic History of Art in America

User Review  - Darraghmc80 - Goodreads

I found this big informative lump of a book in the charity shop. Speaking of big informative lumps, Robert Hughes is fun to read. He's nothing if not opinionated and this history is very clearly ... Read full review

About the author (1997)

Robert Hughes was born in Sydney, Australia on July 28, 1938. He studied art and architecture at the University of Sydney. He pursued art criticism mostly as a sideline while painting, writing poetry and serving as a cartoonist for the weekly intellectual journal The Observer. He left Australia and spent time in Italy before settling in London, where he became a well-known critical voice and wrote for several newspapers. He was chief art critic for Time magazine for over 30 years. He wrote several books including The Fatal Shore, American Visions: The Epic History of Art in America, Culture of Complaint: The Fraying of America, Things I Didn't Know, and Rome. He also hosted an eight-part documentary about the development of modernism from the Impressionists through Warhol entitled The Shock of the New. It was seen by more than 25 million viewers when it ran first on BBC and then on PBS. He also wrote a book by the same name about the series. He died after a long illness on August 6, 2012 at the age of 74.

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