Butterfly Economics: A New General Theory of Social and Economic Behavior

Front Cover
Basic Books, 2000 - Business & Economics - 217 pages
6 Reviews
In this cogently and elegantly argued analysis of why human beings persist in engaging in behavior that defies time-honored economic theory, Ormerod also explains why governments and industries throughout the world must completely reconfigure their traditional methods of economic forecasting if they are to succeed and prosper in an increasingly complicated global marketplace.
  

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Review: Butterfly Economics A New General Theory Of Social And Economic Behavior

User Review  - Kelly Reid - Goodreads

A bit hard to get through, but had some good ideas. Reading it in 2013, not 1998 has benefits and drawbacks. The chapters with tons of scatter-plot graphs weren't my thing, but if you're really hardcore into math, you will like it. Read full review

Review: Butterfly Economics A New General Theory Of Social And Economic Behavior

User Review  - Grim-Anal King - Goodreads

It seems I'm heading backwards through Ormerod's books so there was a little repetition for me but this proved another decent dismantling of some economic shibboleths, seemingly nudging the reader towards a more rational economic approach. Read full review

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Selected pages

Contents

Living at the Edge of Chaos
2
Dedicated Followers of Fashion
12
To Catch a Thief
29
Family Values
48
Use the Maths Then Burn It
60
The Illusion of Control
76
A Quantitative Quagmire
92
Ups and Downs
104
To Have and Have Not
153
Great Oaks from Little Acorns
167
Less Can Be More
183
Appendix One
194
Appendix Two
199
Appendix Three
201
Bibliography
202
Index
206

Through a Glass Darkly
122
The Wealth of Nations
143

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About the author (2000)

Paul Ormerod has been head of the Economic Assessment Unit at The Economist and a visiting professor at the Universities of London and Manchester. He lives in London.

Bibliographic information