An Epitome of the Official History of New South Wales: From the Foundation of the Colony, in 1788, to the Close of the First Session of the Eleventh Parliament Under Responsible Government, in 1883 (Google eBook)

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Thomas Richards, 1883 - New South Wales - 790 pages
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Page 111 - That an humble Address be presented to her Majesty, praying that her Majesty will be graciously pleased to...
Page 337 - An Act to enable Her Majesty to assent 1o a Bill, as amended, of the Legislature of New South Wales, " to confer a Constitution on New South Wales, and to grant a Civil List to Her Majesty.
Page 8 - The inhabitants of this country are the miserablest people in the world. The Hodmadods of Monomatapa,* though a nasty people, yet for wealth are gentlemen to these; who have no houses and skin garments, sheep, poultry, and fruits of the earth, ostrich eggs, etc.
Page 7 - Trees were not known by any of us. There was pretty long Grass growing under the Trees; but it was very thin. We saw no Trees that bore Fruit or Berries. We saw no sort of Animal, nor any Track of Beast, but once; and that seemed to be the Tread of a Beast as big as a great Mastiff Dog.
Page 13 - They appeared, by the sea-weed that we found sticking to them, to have been used in striking fish. Upon examining the canoes that lay upon the beach, we found them to be the worst we had ever seen : They were between twelve and fourteen feet long, and made of the bark of a tree in one piece, which was drawn together and tied up at each end, the middle being kept open by sticks which were placed across them from gunwale to gunwale as thwarts.
Page 77 - The third principle is, that neither individuals, nor bodies of men belonging to any nation, can form colonies, except with the consent, and under the direction and control of their own government ; and that from any settlement which they may form without the consent of their government they may be ousted. This is simply to say, as far as Englishmen are concerned, that colonies cannot be formed without the consent of the crown.
Page 174 - Revenue, diminished as it is by this most mistaken policy, is in a great measure confined to the introduction among us of people unsuited to our wants, and in many instances, the outpourings of the poorhouses and unions of the United Kingdom, instead of being applied in directing to this Colony a stream of vigorous and efficient labour, calculated to elevate the character of our industrial population. The bestowal of office among us, with but partial exception, is still exercised by or at the nomination...
Page 437 - An Act for the better Security of the Crown and Government of the United Kingdom.
Page 29 - Sydney; agriculture in a yet languishing state ; commerce in its early dawn ; revenue unknown ; threatened with famine ; distracted by faction ; the public buildings in a state of dilapidation and mouldering to decay ; the few roads and bridges...
Page 8 - The two fore-teeth of their upper jaw are wanting in all of them, men and women, old and young, whether they draw them out, I know not; neither have they any beards.

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