The death of Woman Wang

Front Cover
Penguin Books, Jan 1, 1979 - History - 169 pages
23 Reviews
Award-winning author Jonathan D. Spence paints a vivid picture of an obscure place and time: provincial China in the seventeenth century. Life in the northeastern county of T'an-ch'eng emerges here as an endless cycle of floods, plagues, crop failures, banditry, and heavy taxation. Against this turbulent background a tenacious tax collector, an irascible farmer, and an unhappy wife act out a poignant drama at whose climax the wife, having run away from her husband, returns to him, only to die at his hands. Magnificently evoking the China of long ago, The Death of Woman Wang also deepens our understanding of the China we know today.

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Review: The Death of Woman Wang

User Review  - Aaron - Goodreads

Interesting short read. Captures Seventeenth Century Chinese ideals and values masterfully. Drawn from written histories that survived from a poor area between Beijing and Shanghai. Lots of interesting insight. Not a thrilling read though. Read full review

Review: The Death of Woman Wang

User Review  - Ben - Goodreads

This book was overall decent. my favorite part was the stories because they were educational and interesting. I purposely read faster through the other parts to get to the stories. Although the other ... Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
33
Section 3
59
Copyright

5 other sections not shown

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About the author (1979)

Jonathan D. Spence was born in England and received his B.A. from Cambridge University. In 1966 he received his Ph.D. from Yale University and has been a professor of Chinese history there since that time. Spence has won a variety of major fellowships and has served as visiting professor at Belfast's Queens University, Princeton University, and Beijing University. He employs a distinctive writing and historical style, weaving together various kinds of materials to fashion new forms of historical narrative. The best examples of his unique style are The Death of Woman Wang (1979) and The Memory Palace of Matteo Ricci. In his works, Spence provides a uniquely accessible vision of late imperial China. His writings have won numerous awards and prizes. The Gate of Heavenly Peace (1982) won two awards---the Los Angeles Times Book Award and the Henry D. Vursell Memorial Award of the American Academy-Institute of Arts and Letters.