The Journal of Two Voyages Along the Coast of China, in 1831, & 1832: The First in a Chinese Junk, the Second in the British Ship Lord Amherst : with Notices of Siam, Corea, and the Loo-Choo Islands, and Remarks on the Policy, Religion, Etc., of China (Google eBook)

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J.P. Haven, 1833 - China - 332 pages
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Page 114 - God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men, who hold the truth in unrighteousness : because that which may be known of God is manifest in them ; for God hath shewed it unto them. For the invisible things of him from the creation of the world are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even his eternal power and Godhead : so that they are without excuse.
Page 47 - ... only a secondary object. Every one is a shareholder, having the liberty of putting a certain quantity of goods on board ; with which he trades, wheresoever the vessel may touch, caring very little about how soon she may arrive at the port of destination. ' The common sailors receive from the captain nothing but dry rice, and have to provide for themselves their other fare, which is usually very slender. These sailors are not, usually, men who have been trained up to their occupation ; but wretches,...
Page 309 - Confucius taught his disciples to serve the dead as they would serve the living; and he who omits this sacred duty, is stigmatized as the veriest wretch in existence. So general degradation in religion, makes it almost impossible that females should have their proper rank in society. They are the slaves and concubines of their masters — live and die in ignorance — and every effort to raise themselves above the rank assigned them, is regarded as impious arrogance. We should not mention this under...
Page 50 - ... judgment, for having paid more attention to their dumb idols, than we have to the worship of the living and true God. The Chinese sailors are, generally, as intimated above, from the most debased class of people. The major part of them are opium-smokers, gamblers, thieves, and fornicators. They will indulge in the drug till all their wages are squandered ; they will gamble as long as a farthing remains ; they will put off their only jacket and give it to a prostitute. They are poor and in debt...
Page 50 - ... in the drug till all their wages are squandered ; they will gamble as long as a farthing remains ; they will put off their only jacket and give it to a prostitute. They are poor and in debt ; they cheat, and are cheated by one another, whenever it is possible ; and when they have entered a harbor, they have no wish to depart till all they have is wasted, although their families at home may be in the utmost want and distress.
Page 150 - O'ER the gloomy hills of darkness, Look, my soul, be still and gaze ; All the promises do travail With a glorious day of grace. Blessed jubilee, Let thy glorious morning dawn.
Page 107 - Chinese manufactures, but some also with European commodities — trade seemed to be brisk. The town, which stretches several miles along the banks of the river, equals Canton in the bustle of its busy population, and surpasses it in the importance of its native trade. The streets are unpaved, and the houses are built of mud ; but within they are well furnished, with accommodations in the best Chinese style. A great many of the shopkeepers, and...
Page 110 - The river is so thronged with junks, and the mercantile transactions give such life and motion to the scene, as strongly to remind one of Liverpool. As the land in this vicinity yields few productions, and the capital swallows up immense stores, the importations required to supply the wants of the people must be Very great."* The approach to this city from the eastward indicates its importance, and the change from the sparsely populated country lying along the banks of the Pei ho, to the dense crowds...
Page 48 - She is said to have been a virgin, who lived some centuries ago in Fuhkeen, near the district of Fuhchow. On account of having, with great fortitude, and by a kind of miracle, saved her brother who was on the point of drowning, she was deified, and loaded with titles, not dissimilar to those bestowed on the Virgin Mary. Every vessel is furnished with an image of this goddess, before which a lamp is kept burning. Some satellites, in hideous shape, stand round the portly queen, who is always represented...
Page 46 - The several individuals of the crew form one whole, whose principal object in going to sea is trade, the working of the junk being only a secondary object. Every one is a shareholder, having the liberty of putting a certain quantity of goods on board; with which he trades wheresoever the vessel may touch, caring very little about how soon she may arrive at the port of destination. " The common sailors receive from the captain nothing but dry rire.

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