The Waves

Front Cover
Harcourt, 2006 - Fiction - 270 pages
30 Reviews
The Waves is often regarded as Virginia Woolf's masterpiece, standing with those few works of twentieth-century literature that have created unique forms of their own. In deeply poetic prose, Woolf traces the lives of six children from infancy to death who fleetingly unite around the unseen figure of a seventh child, Percival. Allusive and mysterious, The Waves yields new treasures upon each reading.

Annotated and with an introduction by Molly Hite

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - proustitute - LibraryThing

Thus when I come to shape here at this table between my hands the story of my life and set it before you as a complete thing, I have to recall things gone far, gone deep, sunk into this life or that ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - CSRodgers - LibraryThing

I wasn't invited to this party, I guess. I love Woolf's essays and her ideas about fiction, but, with the exception of Mrs. Dalloway, I've never been able to stomach her actual novels. It's not their ... Read full review

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About the author (2006)

Virginia Woolf (1882-1941), one of the major literary figures of the twentieth century, transformed the art of the novel. The author of numerous novels, collections of letters, journals, and short stories, she was an admired literary critic and a master of the essay form.

Mark Hussey, general editor of Harcourt's new annotated Woolf series, is professor of English and women's and gender studies, and editor of the Woolf Studies Annual, at Pace University. He lives in Upper Nyack, New York.

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