Plants of Western New South Wales

Front Cover
Csiro Publishing, Jul 28, 2011 - Nature - 766 pages
0 Reviews
Now back in print. Plants of Western New South Wales grew from the long experience and expertise which the authors acquired during their employment with their respective organisations in the arid and semi-arid pastoral areas of the State. Each author became aware of the need for a comprehensive record illustrating and describing the great array of plants in the area. The need was identified both for people involved in research and advisory services, and particularly for the landholders who need to manage the plants for their livelihood. The book is a landmark because it draws together all of the existing knowledge of plants from the area, adds to it the extensive collections and research of the authors and presents the whole as a comprehensive collation and description of the plants of the dry pastoral portion of the State. Because of its comprehensive nature, the work is significant to pastoralists and people concerned with plants throughout Australia. The 1992 edition of Plants of Western New South Wales has been reprinted and published by CSIRO PUBLISHING with a one page appendix giving website addresses of various herbaria in Australia where the reader can readily access up-to-date information on botanical name changes.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

INTRODUCTION
9
PTERIDOPHYTES Ferns
27
GYMNOSPERMS Pines
35
ANGIOSPERMS Monocots
37
ANGIOSPERMS Dicots
207
APPENDIX
729
ADDENDUM
730
REFERENCES
731
GLOSSARY
735
INDEX
739
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2011)

Geoffrey Mc Iver Cunningham was a Soil Conservationist with the Department of Conservation and Land Management. He runs his own consultancy company Geoff Cunningham Natural Resource Consultants Pty Ltd.

John Holland Leigh retired as a Senior Principal Research Scientist with CSIRO Division of Plant Industry in the mid-1990s. During the period 1960 1969 he was based at CSIRO s Riverina Laboratory at Deniliquin where he undertook research into animal plant relationships in several semi-arid vegetation communities. After his transfer to Canberra, John continued to examine the interactions between fire and grazing animals on sub-alpine and high rainfall grasslands. John has also been involved in categorising the risk status of rare and threatened Australian plants and promoting their conservation. During his career, John prepared over 90 peer-reviewed papers, six books and numerous book chapters.

Bibliographic information