Precarious Life: The Powers of Mourning and Violence

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Verso, 2006 - Political Science - 168 pages
20 Reviews
"In this profound appraisal of post-September 11, 2001 America, Judith Butler considers the conditions of heightened vulnerability and aggression that followed from the attack, and the US government's decision to retaliate. She critiques the use of violence that has emerged as a response to loss, and argues that the dislocation of first-world privilege offers instead a chance to imagine a world in which that violence might be minimized, and in which interdependency becomes acknowledged as the basis for a global political community." --Book Jacket.
  

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Review: Precarious Life: The Powers of Mourning and Violence

User Review  - Joseph Sverker - Goodreads

2014: Reading this a second time together with having read some more Butler made a great difference from the first reading. Having said that, the book stands rather well by itself as well. This is an ... Read full review

Review: Precarious Life: The Powers of Mourning and Violence

User Review  - Caitlin Smith - Goodreads

I read most of this book for a class about popular culture in post-9/11 America. Butler makes a very compelling argument for the need to reevaluate the role of violence in the process of collective ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

EXPLANATION AND EXONERATION OR WHAT WE CAN HEAR
1
VIOLENCE MOURNING POLITICS
19
INDEFINITE DETENTION
50
THE CHARGE OF ANTISEMITISM JEWS ISRAEL AND THE RISKS OF PUBLIC CRITIQUE
101
PRECARIOUS LIFE
128
NOTES
153
INDEX
163
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Judith Butler is Maxine Elliot Professor in the Departments of Rhetoric and Comparative Literature at the University of California, Berkeley. She is the author of Frames of War, Precarious Life, The Psychic Life of Power, Excitable Speech, Bodies that Matter, Gender Trouble, and with Slavoj Zizek and Ernesto Laclau, Contingency, Hegemony, Universality.

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