The Natural History of Dogs: Canidae Or Genus Canis of Authors ; Including Also the Genera Hyaena and Proteles, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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W.H. Lizars, ... S. Highley, ... London; and W. Curry, jun. and Company Dublin., 1840 - Canidae
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Page 76 - Here's no fantastic mask, nor dance But of our kids that frisk and prance: Nor wars are seen Unless upon the green Two harmless lambs are butting one another Which done, both bleating run, each to his mother: And wounds are never found, Save what the ploughshare gives the ground.
Page 88 - Revolution, there was a dog in Paris known by the name of Parade, because he always attended regularly the military parades at the Tuileries. A taste for music was probably the cause of this fancy. He always stood by, and marched with the band ; and at night went to the Ope'ra...
Page 84 - ... acquaintance has a dog which lives at enmity with another dog in the neighbourhood, called York, and angrily barks when the word York is pronounced in his hearing. The late Dr J. Maculloch has related, of his own knowledge, that a shepherd's dog always eluded the intentions of the household regarding him, if aught was whispered in his presence that did not coincide with his wishes. Sir Walter Scott has told a number of anecdotes of a dog called Dandie, the property of a gentleman, which knew...
Page 142 - He had been missing for some time, when, to my great joy, one of the letter-carriers brought him back ; and the man's account was, that in going along a certain street, he heard his bark from the inside of a yard, and knew it immediately. He knocked at the gate, and said to the owner of the premises, 'You have got Sir Thomas Lauder's big dog.' The man denied it. 'But I know you have...
Page 114 - ... some were useful only for their vigilance and barking ; and others for their courage in holding ferocious animals at bay. So large a pack was not indeed maintained without adding greatly to our care and trouble, in supplying them with meat and water, for it was sometimes difficult to procure for them enough of the latter ; but their services were invaluable, often contributing to our safety...
Page 142 - His bark, as you may have heard, is tremendous ; so loud, indeed, that I have often distinguished it when in the meadow walk, nearly a mile off. To it I was indebted for the recovery of the dog when stolen by some carters, not long after I got him. He had been some time missing, when, to my great joy, one of the letter-carriers brought him back; and the man's account was, that in going along a certain street he heard his bark from the inside of a yard. He knocked at the gate, and immediately said...
Page 76 - You'd scorn proud towers, And seek them in these bowers, Where winds sometimes our woods perhaps may shake, But blustering care could never tempest make, Nor murmurs e'er come nigh us, Saving of fountains that glide by us.
Page 154 - For, -when the ox first suspended by the head is lowered, and allowed to fall into the water, men generally swim and guide it by the horns; but, at other times, this service is performed by one or two dogs, who, catching the bewildered animal by the ears, one on each side, force it to swim in the direction of the landing place, and instantly release their hold when they feel it touches the ground; for then the beast naturally walks up to the shore.
Page 154 - We have often witnessed, when vessels with live stock arrive in our West Indian colonies, and the oxen are hoisted out, by a sling passed round the base of their horns, the great assistance they afford to bring them to land. For when the ox, first suspended by the head, is lowered, and allowed to fall into the water, men generally swim, and guide it by the horns ; but at other times this service is performed by one or two dogs, who, catching the bewildered animal by the ears, one on each side, force...
Page 115 - ... mankind. When wandering over pathless deserts, oppressed with vexation and distress at the conduct of my own men, I have turned to these as my only friends, and felt how much inferior to them was Man when actuated only by selfish views.

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