Handbook of Neuropsychology: Emotional behavior and its disorders

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François Boller, Jordan Grafman
Elsevier, 2001 - Medical - 294 pages
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The fifth volume in this series covers emotional behavior and its disorders. The introductory chapters deal with the basic theoretical and anatomical issues in the neuropsychological study of emotions. Both neurobiologically oriented and cognitively oriented theories of emotion are presented and both the detailed anatomo-clinical and theoretical aspects of the anatomical substrates of emotions are covered in depth. The central part of this volume addresses the problem of hemispheric asymmetries in emotional representation. The claims for right hemisphere dominance for emotions and emotional communication are contrasted with those assuming a different hemispheric specialization for positive vs. negative emotions and with models assuming asymmetric cortico-limbic control of human emotion. A final group of chapters examines the neural mechanisms of the stress response and reviews the main emotional disorders. Individual differences in the hemispheric control of the stress response are discussed and the neural mechanisms of affective/emotional disturbances are approached with neuropsychological methods and with functional neuroimaging techniques.

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About the author (2001)

Jordan Grafman, PhD, is director of Brain Injury Research at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. Before joining RIC, Dr. Grafman was director of the Traumatic Brain Injury Research at Kessler Foundation. His investigation of brain function and behavior contributes to advances in medicine, rehabilitation, and psychology, and informs ethics, law, philosophy, and health policy. His study of the human prefrontal cortex and cognitive neuroplasticity incorporates neuroimaging and genetics, an approach that is expanding our knowledge of the impact of traumatic brain injury, as well as other diseases that impair brain function, such as stroke, multiple sclerosis and degenerative diseases. Dr. Grafman aims to translate his research into more effective, targeted rehabilitation to achieve the best outcomes for people with cognitive disabilities. Dr. Grafman's background includes 30 years of experience in brain injury research. He has studied brain function in dementia, depression, and degenerative neurological diseases, as well as TBI. He has authored more than 300 research publications, co-editor of the journal Cortex, and provides peer review for numerous specialty journals. At the National Institutes of Health, he served as chief of the Cognitive Neuroscience Section at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. While in the US Air Force, he served at Walter Reed Army Medical Center as neuropsychology chief of the Vietnam Head Injury Project, a long-term study of more than 500 soldiers with serious injuries of the head and brain. He is the leading expert on the long-term effects of penetrating brain injuries in military personnel. His expertise includes the scope of challenges faced during recovery, including behavioral changes like aggression, late sequelae such as seizures, and the impact on TBI on family life and employment, and legal implications. He is an elected fellow of the American Psychological Association and the New York Academy of Sciences. Dr. Grafman is the recipient of many prestigious awards including the Department of Defense Meritorious Service Award, the National Institutes of Health Award of Merit, 2010 National Institutes of Health Director's Award, and the Humboldt Reserach Award. He is a frequent speaker at national and international conferences. His expert opinion is often sought by national media on issues related to brain function and behavior, cognitive rehabilitation, and policy and legal issues related to brain-behavior research.

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