Lord Methuen and the British Army: Failure and Redemption in South Africa

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Psychology Press, 1999 - History - 279 pages
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This study analyzes the readiness of the British military establishment for war in 1899 and its performance in the South African War (1899-1902). It focuses on the career of Field Marshal Paul Sanford, 3rd Baron Methuen, whose traditional military training, used so effectively in Queen Victoria's small wars, was put to the test by the modern challenges of the South African War. A subsidiary aim of this work is to correct and refine the historical consensus that Methuen's campaing in the South African War was plagued by practical errors and poor judgement. The South African War was a crucial transitional episode in the history of the British army. Unlike Great Britain's other expeditions, it required the concentrated resources of the entire empire. It was a modern war in the sense that it employed the technology, the weaponry, the communications, and the transportation of the second industrial revolution.
  

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Contents

The Barons Son Joins the Guards 186481
9
Establishing a Name From Egypt to India 188299
37
The Armys Scapegoat
63
The British Army and the Outbreak of War in South Africa
65
The Advance to Modder River
85
Failure at Magersfontein
123
The Restoration of a Career
161
Restoring a Name
163
From Notoriety to Obscurity
200
Continuing to Serve
237
Conclusion
251
Bibliography
255
Index
271
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Stephen M. Miller is a seminary-educated journalist and a full-time freelance writer and editor who specializes in Bible-related books. A former newspaper reporter with a degree in journalism from Kent State University, Miller made the switch to Christian writing after adding a degree in biblical studies at Nazarene Theological Seminary. He has received numerous awards, including the Evangelical Press Association's highest honor, the Award of Excellence. He was also awarded "best non-fiction book of 2006" by the Christian Retailers Association, and "best non-fiction book of 2005" by the Christian Broadcasting Council.

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