The Bible Unearthed: Archaeology's New Vision of Ancient Isreal and the Origin of Sacred Texts

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Simon and Schuster, Mar 6, 2002 - Religion - 400 pages
55 Reviews
In this groundbreaking work that sets apart fact and legend, authors Finkelstein and Silberman use significant archeological discoveries to provide historical information about biblical Israel and its neighbors.

In this iconoclastic and provocative work, leading scholars Israel Finkelstein and Neil Asher Silberman draw on recent archaeological research to present a dramatically revised portrait of ancient Israel and its neighbors. They argue that crucial evidence (or a telling lack of evidence) at digs in Israel, Egypt, Jordan, and Lebanon suggests that many of the most famous stories in the Bible—the wanderings of the patriarchs, the Exodus from Egypt, Joshua’s conquest of Canaan, and David and Solomon’s vast empire—reflect the world of the later authors rather than actual historical facts.

Challenging the fundamentalist readings of the scriptures and marshaling the latest archaeological evidence to support its new vision of ancient Israel, The Bible Unearthed offers a fascinating and controversial perspective on when and why the Bible was written and why it possesses such great spiritual and emotional power today.
  

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Review: The Bible Unearthed: Archaeology's New Vision of Ancient Israel and the Origin of Its Sacred Texts

User Review  - Ahmed Hijji - Goodreads

A great book that tells how the Hebrew bible was constructed, from an academic point of view beyond the bias of dogma. The bible is way earthly than anybody might think, which didn't make it any less ... Read full review

Review: The Bible Unearthed: Archaeology's New Vision of Ancient Israel and the Origin of Its Sacred Texts

User Review  - Patrick L. - Goodreads

This is a fascinating archaeological account of the Old Testament that upends many of the stories by showing the archaeological and historical evidence refuting many of the stories. It points out the ... Read full review

Contents

In the Days of King Josiah
1
Archaeology and the Bible
4
The Bible as History?
25
Searching for the Patriarchs
27
Did the Exodus Happen?
48
The Conquest of Canaan
72
Who Were the Israelites?
97
Memories of a Golden Age?
123
Between War and Survival
251
A Great Reformation
275
Exile and Return
296
The Future of Biblical Israel
315
Theories of the Historicity of the Patriarchal Age
319
Searching for Sinai
326
Alternative Theories of the Israelite Conquest
329
Why the Traditional Archaeology of the Davidic and Solomonic Period Is Wrong
340

The Rise and Fall of Ancient Israel
147
One State One Nation One People?
149
Israels Forgotten First Kingdom
169
In the Shadow of Empire
196
Judah and the Making of Biblical History
227
The Transformation of Judah
229
Identifying the Era of Manasseh in the Archaeological Record
345
How Vast Was the Kingdom of Josiah?
347
The Boundaries of the Province of Yehud
354
Bibliography
356
Index
373
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Israel Finkelstein is a professor of archaeology at Tel Aviv University. He is a leading figure in the archaeology of the Levant and the laureate of the 2005 Dan David Prize in the Past Dimension -- Archaeology. Finkelstein served for many years as the Director of the Institute of Archaeology at Tel Aviv University and is the co-Director of the Megiddo Expedition. He is the co-author, with Neil Silberman, of The Bible Unearthed (Free Press, 2001) and the author of many field reports and scholarly articles.

Neil Asher Silberman is director of historical interpretation for the Ename Center for Public Archaeology and Heritage Presentation in Belgium. He is a contributing editor to Archaeology magazine and the author of The Hidden Scrolls: Christianity, Judaism, and the War for the Dead Sea Scrolls; The Message and the Kingdom; and Digging for God and Country, among other books.

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