Memoirs of Joseph Holt: general of the Irish rebels, in 1798, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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H. Colburn, 1838 - Ireland
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Page 139 - I have studied human nature more than books. I had the management of many more men in my own country, and I was always rigidly just to them. I never oppressed them, or suffered them to cheat their employers, or each other. They knew if they did their duty they would be well treated ; and if not, sent to the right about.
Page 253 - now that you have lived in the bush, do you think the change you made was for the better ? Are you sorry for what you have done?" "Yes, sir." "And will you promise never to go away again ?" " Never, sir." " Go to the storekeeper, then...
Page 140 - They knew, if they did their duty, they would be well treated, and if not, sent to the right about. I follow the same course with the men here I should think myself very ill qualified to act as your overseer, were I to have a man or two flogged every week. Besides the horrible inhumanity of the practice, the loss of a man's week or fortnight's work, will not be a trifle in...
Page 253 - I never heard of any other governor or commandant acting in this manner, nor did I ever witness much leniency from any governor. I have, however, been assured that there -was less crime and much fewer faults committed among the people under Governor Collins than in any other settlement ; which I think is a clear proof -that mercy and humanity are the best policy.
Page 77 - ... rendered himself so eminently serviceable, that the governor resolved to draw him from the line of convicts; and, with the instrument of his emancipation, he received a grant of thirty acres of land in an eligible...
Page 296 - Majesty for half his nominal pay ; I can prove what I assert, as I have often bought goods from the soldiers myself, upon these terms. It was, I must confess, very provoking to see the officers draw the goods from the public store, to traffic in them for their own private gain, which goods were sent out for the advantage of the settlers, who were compelled to deal with those huxter officers for such articles as they mav require, giving them from fifty to five hundred per cent, profit, and paying...
Page 298 - The extraordinary fluctuations in the value of articles of domestic consumption, to which the colony was subject, for many years after its original establishment, and the extraordinary profits that were not unfrequently realized on the investment of a small capital, in mercantile speculation, afforded the officers of the New South Wales Corps, both a CAPTAINS JOHN PIPER AND EDWARD ABBOTT.
Page 252 - This gentleman had the good will, the good wishes, and the good word of every one in the settlement. His conduct was exemplary, and his disposition most humane. His treatment of the runaway convicts was conciliatory, and even kind. He would go into the forests among the natives to allow these poor creatures, the runaways, an opportunity of returning to their former condition ; and, half dead with cold and hunger, they would come and drop on their knees before him, imploring pardon for their behaviour....
Page 296 - I must confess, very provoking to see the officers draw the goods from the public store, to traffic in them for their own private gain, which goods were sent out for the advantage of the settlers, who were compelled to deal with those huxter officers, for such articles as they may require, giving them from fifty to five hundred per cent, profit, and paying in grain. It thus would happen, that one of these monopolizers, who never grew a grain, would sometimes have a thousand bushels of wheat to put...
Page 150 - the Governor, who was very desirous of preserving the friendly intercourse which seemed to have taken place, readily promised, and gave the necessary directions for its being built.

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