Lawyers in the Alice: Aboriginals and Whitefellas' Law

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Federation Press, Jan 1, 1993 - Aboriginal Australians - 196 pages
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Much has been said and written about race relations in Australia; much remains to be explored. Part of that unchartered territory is the story of how Australian Aboriginals began to exercise their rights under the white legal system. Part, a central part, of that story is the story of how legal aid began in Alice Springs. And that's the story this book tells: the tale of how an outback town was changed for ever. Jon Faine has talked to many of those involved in the early days of Aboriginal legal aid in Alice Springs and a couple of lawyers who practised there before that. He tells the story of Aboriginal people deciding to organise and embark on political campaigns; of the success of CAALAS being the springboard for health centres, land councils and other community organisations; of changes in priorities from criminal law to land rights and commercial law; of lawyers employed by CAALAS moving on to play major roles in Aboriginal and legal affairs. This is oral history at its best: personal and evocative, passionate and reflective, entertaining and informative.
  

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Contents

Neil Hargrave
1
Ian Barker
5
Paul Coe
14
Jim Berg
22
Pat Miller
28
James Montgomery
37
Geoff Eames
45
David Parsons
66
Betty Carter
100
Phillip Toyne
106
Ross Howie
121
Pat OShane
139
Frank Vincent
151
John Coldrey
163
Pam Ditton
175
Bruce Donald
187

Maria PalmerThompson
80
Peter Rotumah
89

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