Zodiac

Front Cover
Random House Publishing Group, 1988 - Fiction - 308 pages
24 Reviews
Sangamon Taylor's a New Age Sam Spade who sports a wet suit instead of a trench coat and prefers Jolt from the can to Scotch on the rocks. He knows about chemical sludge the way he knows about evil -- all too intimately. And the toxic trail he follows leads to some high and foul places. Before long Taylor's house is bombed, his every move followed, he's adopted by reservation Indians, moves onto the FBI's most wanted list, makes up with his girlfriend, and plays a starring role in the near-assassination of a presidential candidate. Closing the case with the aid of his burnout roomate, his tofu-eating comrades, three major networks, and a range of unconventional weaponry, Sangamon Taylor pulls off the most startling caper in Boston Harbor since the Tea Party. As he navigates this ecological thriller with hardboiled wit and the biggest outboard motor he can get his hands on, Taylor reveals himself as one of the last of the white-hatted good guys in a very toxic world.

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The second novel by the great writer. - Goodreads
A much better take on a Crichton-esque plotline. - Goodreads
... and incredibly well executed writing. - Goodreads

Review: Zodiac

User Review  - Gendou - Goodreads

The main character and narrator of this book is one awesome dude. He's an ecological activist who fights big corporations that pollute the environment with chemical waste. The bad guys are ... Read full review

Review: Zodiac

User Review  - kyknoord - Goodreads

If you're even slightly OCD about cleanliness, you might want to give this one a skip. You've heard of "gritty realism"? Zodiac has "slimy realism", which is a bit more hard-core, in my opinion. The ... Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
14
Section 3
20
Copyright

32 other sections not shown

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About the author (1988)

Neal Stephenson, the science fiction author, was born on October 31, 1959 in Maryland. He graduated from Boston University in 1981 with a B.A. in Geography with a minor in physics. His first novel, The Big U, was published in 1984. It received little attention and stayed out of print until Stephenson allowed it to be reprinted in 2001. His second novel was Zodiac: The Eco-Thriller was published in 1988, but it was his novel Snow Crash (1992) that brought him popularity. It fused memetics, computer viruses, and other high-tech themes with Sumerian mythology. Neal Stephenson has won several awards: Hugo for Best Novel for The Diamond Age (1996), the Arthur C. Clark for Best Novel for Quicksilver (2004), and the Prometheus Award for Best Novel for The System of the World (2005). He recently completed the The Baroque Cycle Trilogy, a series of historical novels. It consists of eight books and was originally published in three volumes and Reamde. He currently resides in Seattle, Washington. Stephenson also writes under the pseudonym Stephen Bury.

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