Limits of Language: Almost Everything You Didn't Know You Didn't Know about Language and Languages

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Battlebridge Publications, 2006 - Communication - 394 pages
5 Reviews
In what country are people the most polyglot? Can a word be used to mean the opposite of itself? Has there ever been a state with Esperanto as its official language? Can Koko the Gorilla handle human speech? How do deaf Japanese say 'condom'? What is the least useful dictionary ever produced? What is the world's smallest language? Does English have more words than other languages? Can words consist of consonants alone? Are there native speakers of Klingon? Which country has the most generous minority language policy? These and hundreds of other questions are answered in Limits of language, a dazzling collection of the most extreme and unusual facts about the languages of the world. Written for a very wide readership, this book will both entertain the general public and inform them about the vast array of phenomena that make languages so interesting yet so diverse, while defining for students and teachers the limits of linguistic variability.

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Review: Limits of Language: Almost Everything You Didn't Know You Didn't Know about Language and Languages

User Review  - Terence - Goodreads

This book was a bit of a disappointment: Not quite what I was expecting. As the author himself notes in his introduction, it's a Guiness Book of World Records-like compilation of factoids about ... Read full review

Review: Limits of Language: Almost Everything You Didn't Know You Didn't Know about Language and Languages

User Review  - Beth - Goodreads

great content, terrible editing and layout. Read full review

Contents

Big and small languages
55
Language history
73
Written language
93
Copyright

10 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2006)

Mikael Parkvall is a professional linguist who teaches and does research at the University of Stockholm.

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