Turkey, Greece and Malta (Google eBook)

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Page 123 - I'll give thee this plague for thy dowry, be thou as chaste as ice, as pure as snow, thou shall not escape calumny. Get thee to a nunnery, go : farewell. Or, if thou wilt needs marry, marry a fool , for wise men know well enough what monsters you make of them. To a nunnery, go , and quickly too.
Page 436 - An Act to enable His Majesty to make Regulations for the better defining and establishing the Powers and Jurisdiction of His Majesty's Consuls in the Ottoman Empire...
Page 168 - NATION. CHARGED by His MAJESTY, the King of Great Britain, to conduct all the affairs (except the military) of these islands of Malta and Gozo, with the title of His Majesty's Civil Commissioner, I embrace, with the highest satisfaction, this opportunity of assuring you of the paternal care and affection of the KING towards you; and that His MAJESTY GRANTS YOU FULL PROTECTION, AND THE ENJOYMENTS OF ALL YOUR DEAREST RIGHTS.
Page 131 - ... and Corfu ; to and from Alexandria ; weekly communication with France and Italy, annihilates the distance. You travel in all countries by their means ; you gain information and amusement through them. The panorama is ever shifting." Here Mr. Slade encountered the celebrated Prince Puckler Muskau," After a tour through the regencies of Tunis and Algiers, in which he crossed mountains the French stopped at, discovered ruins superior to the Athenian remains, and experienced a reception from every...
Page 158 - ... to be governed by their ancient laws, conformably to the spirit of the British constitution, he adopted the detested code of Rohan, which had already destroyed some of their privileges, and which code is in force in the island to this day. In 1813, Sir Thomas Maitland arrived in Malta as governor, when the last deadly blow was given to the remaining national institutions of the Maltese. Their magistrates, under the name of Giurati, formed a highly respectable board, which had existed for many...
Page 453 - ... therefore, that government will support Lord Ponsonby's vigorous conduct. The undersigned, his Britannic Majesty's Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, has the honour to acquaint his Excellency the Minister for Foreign Affairs, for the information of the Sublime Porte, that his Excellency, Akif Effendi, having violated the rights of a British subject rights conferred by the Sultans of glorious memory, and most particularly respected by the illustrious Sovereign now reigning, for...
Page 453 - ... the Sultans of glorious memory, and most particularly respected by the illustrious Sovereign now reigning, for the happiness of his subjects the undersigned is obliged to declare to the Sublime Porte that the undersigned will not any longer hold official communication with his Excellency, Akif Effendi; and the undersigned respectfully submits to the Sublime Porte, and emphatically to the Sultan himself, his just complaint against the Minister who has dared to violate the laws of his own Sovereign,...
Page 452 - ... place by Russia, because they are hostile to us. As every event, however favourable, (as long as we are indisposed to act) must be turned against us; so, if we display energy, every thing must tell in our favour. We trust, therefore, that government will support Lord Ponsonby's vigorous conduct. The undersigned, his Britannic Majesty's Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, has the honour to acquaint his Excellency the Minister for Foreign Affairs, for the information of the Sublime Porte,...
Page 124 - As superiors, it is our duty to make first advances ; as superiors, we should drop the national feeling, exclusiveness, which broke up more than one public amusement where the English and natives might mingle without etiquette, without feelings of condescension on one side or the other. Our customs, diametrically opposed, offer, it must be confessed, a bar to sociality. We dine at six ; they dine at two. We associate through the instrumentality of cookery and wine ; they are satisfied with simple...
Page 286 - may be defined an effect " of a certain portion of light and shade on a part " of Sipylus, perceivable at a particular point of

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